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Validation of numerical simulation tools for wind-driven natural ventilation design

This paper presents a validation of airflow network (AFN) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for a naturally ventilated office building using wind tunnel measurements as the reference for external pressure coefficients and effective airflow rate prediction. The CFD simulation model is also used to study the effect of partially open windows on the effective flow rate. This study also includes a design exercise for a naturally ventilated office building that analyses the differences in predicted average window open area for a typical weather year.

Breakthrough of natural and hybrid ventilative cooling technologies: models and simulations

This special issue on Breakthrough of natural and hybrid ventilative cooling technologies: models and simulations, together with the connected issue Breakthrough of natural and hybrid ventilative cooling technologies: strategies, applications and case studies (vol. 16, issue 1), focuses on methods, tools and technologies for reaching the above-mentioned goal through the use of ventilative cooling, i.e. cooling by controlled natural ventilation (CNV). This strategy is one of the most cost-effective alternatives to air-conditioning systems.

Analysis of the Effects of Ventilation Method on Indoor Humidity Distribution and Condensation by CFD method

People spend 70% -90% of their time indoors. Indoor air quality and human body’s health have a close relationship. With the advance of society, user comfort requirements for thermal environment are rising. Humidity is an important parameter for evaluating indoor air quality, which not only affects the thermal comfort of the human body but also seriously restricts the function of the building. In winter, the indoor humidity is dry. When using humidifier, the humidity around the humidifier is higher, but there is still a dry area in the room.

A use case of data analysis for assessing Indoor Air Quality indicators

Product connectivity makes products and systems remotely controllable and possibly interoperable with other devices in the house. 
The most common way to achieve this interoperability is to connect these devices locally. On the other hand, products may also be cloud-connected, which allows an easier and seamless interoperability between devices. Hence, data are collected and stored in the cloud. As soon as the measured data is sent to the cloud, large set of data are available and can be anonymously retrieved and statistically analyzed. 

Ventilative cooling effectiveness in office buildings: a parametrical simulation

Controlled Natural Ventilation (CNV) is one of the potential most effective passive cooling technique to reduce cooling needs of buildings in temperate-hot climate zones. However, a correct balance amid internal heat capacity, thermal insulation, and net opening area is important to achieve optimal results. The present paper shows results from an original simulation process carried out within the Course “ICT in building design” of the Master degree programme ICT4SS (ICT for smart societies) at the Politecnico di Torino.

The Reintroduction of Natural Ventilation to a 19th Century Opera House, Utilising Calibrated Computer Simulation and User Operation

The Royal Wanganui Opera House (RWOH), in Whanganui, New Zealand, was constructed in 1899, and now seats 830 people. This building was designed with a natural ventilation system; however, this system is no longer in operation and the RWOH has received regular complaints from patrons regarding indoor thermal comfort. Various options for mechanical systems to improve indoor comfort during summer performances have been considered, but have been deemed too costly. The RWOH is listed with Heritage New Zealand as a Category 1 heritage building.

Possible UK residential demand-controlled ventilation assessment methodology

Demand controlled ventilation (DCV) can improve the energy performance of all kinds of ventilation systems, in residential and non-residential buildings and is already part of the European Lot 6 and Ecodesign regulations and standards. However, the lack of recognition of DCV in SAP (Standard Assessment Procedure) forms a great barrier for the use of this technology in the UK. A methodology was developed to prove the guarantee on good IAQ, with potential saving on heating and auxiliary energy by modulating ventilation rates based on actual demand.

The influence of occupancy behaviour on the performance of mechanical ventilation systems regarding energy consumption and IAQ

It has already been proven that a large portion of the energy consumption gap between simulations and reality is due to the occupant behaviour in buildings. The improving airtightness of buildings makes that Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) can no longer rely on air renewal through infiltrations, bringing the need of ventilation systems. Within this frame, an ongoing dissertation focuses on the relationship between occupancy behaviour and ventilation systems in low energy buildings.

Study of variants to classical mechanical exhaust ventilation systems by using mechanical exhaust in habitable rooms

Nowadays, due to the higher energy performance of dwellings, ventilation plays an increasing role in maintaining a good indoor comfort. Therefore new ventilation strategies in combination with demand controlled ventilation are needed to accomplish high energy-efficient ventilation (limiting ventilation losses and auxiliary energy consumption) while providing good indoor air quality, thermal and acoustic comfort.

Effectiveness of Ventilative Cooling Strategies in Hot and Dry and Temperate Climates of India

Increasing use of air-conditioning in India is applying upward pressure on energy demand and may have implications on dependability. Electrical energy can be saved if favourable outdoor conditions are effectively utilized for cooling buildings with the minimum use of energy. This could be specifically applicable to residences where night-time use is more predominant for cooling by air conditioning systems but also aligns favourably with suitable outdoor conditions to be used as ventilative cooling.

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