Airbase

AIRBASE is the Bibliographic Database of the AIVC. It contains publications and abstracts of articles related to energy efficient ventilation. Where possible, sufficient detail is supplied in the bibliographic details for users to trace and order the material via their own libraries. Topics include: ventilation strategies, design and retrofit methods, calculation techniques, standards and regulations, measurement methods, indoor air quality and energy implications etc. Entries are based on articles and reports published in journals, internal publications and research reports, produced both by university departments and by building research institutions throughout the world. AIRBASE has grown and evolved over many years (1979 to present day, over 22000 references and 16000 documents available online). For most of the references, the full document is also available online.

The AIVC website includes a protected content feature that provides access to AIRBASE. Access to the protected content is free of charge but requires you to register first.


 
AIVC's Ventilation Information Paper #45.6 summarizes current knowledge on trends in building and ductwork airtightness in France.
Bassam Moujalled, Adeline Mélois, France
AIVC's Ventilation Information Paper #45.4 summarizes current knowledge on trends in building and ductwork airtightness in Belgium.
Liesje Van Gelder, Maarten De Strycker, Christophe Delmotte, Arnold Janssens, Belgium
AIVC's Ventilation Information Paper #45.5 summarizes current knowledge on trends in building and ductwork airtightness in Latvia. 
Andrejs Nitijevskis, Vladislavs Keviss, Nolwenn Hurel, EU
AIVC's Ventilation Information Paper #45.3 summarizes current knowledge on trends in building and ductwork airtightness in the Czech Republic. 
Jiří Novák, Daniel Adamovský, Jan Vitouš, Czech Republic
AIVC's Ventilation Information Paper #45.2 summarizes current knowledge on trends in building and ductwork airtightness in Spain.
Timo Hoek, Irene Poza-Casado, Sergio Melgosa
As the AIVC was created in 1979, the 40th anniversary of the AIVC was celebrated in October 2019 at the 40th AIVC conference in Ghent. In the context of this celebration, it was decided to publish 2 overview publications:
Willem de Gids, Max Sherman
Much progress has been made to improve the airtightness level of new buildings. Still, little is known about the durability of building airtightness, or the impact of degradation on airtightness.
Valerie Leprince, Nolwenn Hurel, Bassam Moujalled
AIVC's Ventilation Information Paper #45.1 summarizes current knowledge on trends in building and ductwork airtightness in Estonia.
Targo Kalamees, Jaanus Hallik, Alo Mikola
As the AIVC was created in 1979, the 40th anniversary of the AIVC was celebrated in October 2019 at the 40th AIVC conference in Ghent. In the context of this celebration, it was decided to publish 2 overview publications:
Peter Wouters, Maria Kapsalaki, Willem de Gids, Martin Liddament
The AIVC (Air Infiltration and Ventilation Centre), TightVent Europe (the building and ductwork airtightness platform) and venticool (the platf
Maria Kapsalaki, Peter Wouters
The overall objective of the International Energy Agency project, Energy in Buildings and Communities Annex 68 "Indoor Air Quality Design and Control in Low-energy Residential Buildings,"1 is to provide a scientific basis for optimal and practical
Marc Abadie, Pawel Wargocki, Carsten Rode, Jensen Zhang
AIVC's Ventilation Information Paper #44: Residential Cooker Hoods,  summarizes current knowledge on cooking contaminant emissions, its effects on IAQ, and identifies standards for assessing the efficacy of cooker hood (also known as a range hood)
Iain Walker, Benjamin Jones, Wouter Borsboom, EU
AIVC Technical Note 68 (TN 68) "Residential Ventilation and Health” is one of the outcomes of the work performed under the framework
Marie Coggins, Simon Jones
Ziel der Arbeit/Fragestellung
Dirk Biedermann, Malte Bengelsdorf, Michael Förster
Purpose of the work
Bassam Moujalled, Adeline Mélois, Valérie Leprince, Gaëlle Guyot
Throughout the world more and more high-rises or very tall buildings are being checked for air leaks. In February 2021 air permeability measurements were carried out in a 125-meter-high building with 37 storeys.
Emanuel Mairinger, Johannes Neubig, Thomas Gayer, Stefanie Rolfsmeier, Gary Nelson, Collin Olson

Pages