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Construction and set-up of a full-scale experimental house for ventilation studies

This paper reports on the construction, experimental set up and infiltration characteristics of a purpose built full-scale experimental house. The building has been designed as an experimental platform for measuring the moisture removal effectiveness of active and passive ventilation systems with indoor and outdoor climate conditions seen in New Zealand.

Overflow elements: Impacts on energy efficiency, indoor air quality and sound attenuation

When planning ventilation systems for energy efficient housing, an appropriate design of the overflow elements between rooms is important as it influences ventilation losses, indoor air quality and sound attenuation between rooms. Based on calculation results of the natural in- or exfiltration rates through the building envelope as a function of the overflow element’s flow resistance, this work proposes a maximal pressure drop of 2-3Pa for overflow elements in energy efficient buildings.

U.S commercial building airtightness requirements and measurements

In 1998, Persily published a review of commercial and institutional building airtightness data that found significant levels of air leakage and debunked the myth of the airtight commercial building. Since that time, the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has maintained a database of measured airtightness levels of U.S. commercial building leakages, in part to support the development and technical evaluation of airtightness requirements for national and state codes, standards and programs.

Preliminary analysis of U.S residential air leakage database v.2011

Air leakage and other diagnostic measurements are being added to LBNL’s Residential Diagnostics Database (ResDB). We describe the sources of data that amount to more than 80,000 blower door measurements. We present summary statistics of selected parameters, such as floor area and year built. We compare the house characteristics of new additions to ResDB with prior data.

Simple error reduction in tracer-gas field-measurements of air handling units

Tracer gas measurements are an unparalleled means of measuring air recirculation, leakage, and air flow rates in air handling systems [1-5]. However, such measurements are subject to significant measurement uncertainty in field conditions. A common problem is imperfect mixing of tracer gas.

Development of Infiltration Modeling Parameters for a SIPs Building

Reduction of infiltration in the Equinox House, a residence under construction in Urbana Illinois, has been characterized through a series of blower tests as different joints and seams in the building were sealed. Equinox House is constructed with 30 cm thick SIPs (Structural Insulation Panels) wall and roof panels consisting of a Styrofoam core and oriented strand board sheathing on interior and exterior surfaces. Blower door tests were performed as each type of seam in the house was sealed.

Effect of Party Wall Permeability on Estimations of Infiltration from Air Leakage

The importance of reducing adventitious infiltration in order to save energy is highlighted by the relevant building standards of many countries.  This operational infiltration is often inferred via the measurement of the air leakage rate at a pressure differential of 50 Pascals.  Some building codes, such as the UK’s Standard Assessment Procedure, assume a simple relationship between the air leakage rate and mean infiltration rate during the heating season, the so-called leakage-infiltration ratio, which is scaled to account for the physical and environmental properties of a dwelling.  The

Air Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report

Most dwellings in the United States are ventilated primarily through leaks in the building shell (i.e., infiltration) rather than by whole-house mechanical ventilation systems. Consequently, quantification of envelope air-tightness is critical to determining how much energy is being lost through infiltration and how much infiltration is contributing toward ventilation requirements. Envelope air tightness and air leakage can be determined from fan pressurization measurements with a blower door. Tens of thousands of unique fan pressurization measurements have been made of U.S.

Analysis of U.S. Residential Air Leakage Database

The air leakage of a building envelope can be determined from fan pressurization measurements with a blower door. More than 70,000 air leakage measurements have been compiled into a database. In addition to air leakage, the database includes other important characteristics of the dwellings tested, such as floor area, year built, and location. There are also data for some houses on the presence of heating ducts, and floor/basement construction type. The purpose of this work is to identify house characteristics that can be used to predict air leakage.

Field Validation of Algebraic Equations for Stack and Wind Driven Air Infiltration Calculations

Explicit algebraic equations for calculation of wind and stack driven ventilation were developed by parametrically matching exact solutions to the flow equations for building envelopes. These separate wind and stack effect flow calculation procedures were incorporated in a simple natural ventilation model, AIM- 2, with empirical functions for superposition of wind and stack effect and for estimating wind shelter.

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