AIVC - Air Infiltration and Ventilation Centre

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The Role of Carbon Dioxide in Ventilation and IAQ Evaluation: 40 years of AIVC

The purpose of this summary is to review Air Infiltration and Ventilation Centre activities, as reflected in its publications, related to indoor carbon dioxide over the 40 years that have transpired since its creation. These activities, like most applications of indoor CO2 to the fields of ventilation and indoor air quality, have focused on the following: control of outdoor ventilation rates, i.e., demand control ventilation; use as a tracer gas to measure outdoor air change rates; providing an indicator or metric of IAQ; and, directly impacting human health, comfort and performance.

CO2 concentration of the surrounding air near sleeping infants inside a crib

The indoor air quality is very important for the well-being of occupants, especially in the case of young babies. This research focuses on the air quality of the surrounding air inside a crib with sleeping infants. To study the effects of different sleeping positions of the baby with in the crib a measurement setup was created in the laboratory. The breathing of an infant was simulated by means of a baby doll with air supply mixed with CO2 and measured at different sensor locations for different sleeping positions.

Residential Application of an Indoor Carbon Dioxide Metric

Indoor carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations have been used for decades to evaluate indoor air quality (IAQ) and ventilation. However, many of these applications reflect a lack of understanding of the connection between indoor CO2, ventilation rates and IAQ. In particular, a concentration of 1800 mg/m3 (1000 ppmv) has been used as a metric of IAQ and ventilation without an appreciation of its basis or application.

Development of an Indoor Carbon Dioxide Metric

Indoor carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations have been used for decades to purportedly evaluate indoor air quality (IAQ) and ventilation. However, many applications of CO2 as a metric have reflected a lack of understanding of the connection between indoor CO2 levels, ventilation and IAQ. In many cases, an indoor concentration of 1800 mg/m3 (1000 ppmv) has been used as a metric of IAQ and ventilation without understanding its basis or significance.

Quantitative relationships between classroom CO2 concentration and learning in elementary schools

The data from published studies were used to build relationships between learning outcomes and air quality in classrooms. Psychological tests measuring cognitive abilities and skills, school tasks including mathematical and language-based tasks, ratings schemes and tests used to assess progress in learning including end-of-year grades and exam scores were considered to represent learning outcomes. Indoor air quality was characterized by concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2). Short-term sick leave was included as well because it can influence learning.

A New Approach to Estimating Carbon Dioxide Generation Rates from Building Occupants

Indoor carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations have been used in the fields of building ventilation and indoor air quality (IAQ) for decades. Specific applications include the estimation of ventilation rates, control of outdoor air ventilation rates based on indoor CO2 as an indicator of occupancy, and use of CO2 as an IAQ performance metric. All of these applications require values for the CO2 generation rates of the occupants of the space or building being considered. Human CO2 generation rates depend on their level of physical activity as well as their sex, age, and body size.

Capture efficiency of air curtain assisted residential range hoods

Air curtain assisted range hoods are very customary in large industrial kitchens. They allow to increase the capture efficiency of the range hood while lowering the net exhaust flow rate. For applications in residential settings, there is a lack of data on the performance of air curtain assisted range hoods, as well as a lack of information on the required settings and boundary conditions to come to the successful application of air curtain assisted range hoods.

Effects of Carbon Dioxide With and Without Bioeffluents on humans

Carbon dioxide (CO2) has traditionally been assumed innocuous at the typical levels indoors, and merely an indicator of metabolic emissions from humans (bioeffluents). Recent studies suggest that exposure to pure CO2 at concentrations of 2,500 to 4,000 ppm, the levels that occur periodically indoors, can have negative effects on mental performance in form of reduced ability for making decisions, typing and proofreading. Present study aimed to examine further these effects. Twenty-five human subjects were exposed to elevated CO2 with and without bioeffluents in a chamber.

Indoor Carbon Dioxide Concentrations in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality Standards

Indoor carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations have played a role in discussions of ventilation and indoor air quality (IAQ) since the 18th century. Those discussions have evolved over the years to focus on the impacts of CO2 concentrations on building occupants, how these concentrations relate to occupant perception of bioeffluents, the use of indoor CO2 concentrations to estimate ventilation rates, and CO2–based demand control ventilation. This paper reviews how indoor CO2 has been dealt with in ventilation and IAQ standards in the context of these issues.

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