Airbase

AIRBASE is the Bibliographic Database of the AIVC. It contains publications and abstracts of articles related to energy efficient ventilation. Where possible, sufficient detail is supplied in the bibliographic details for users to trace and order the material via their own libraries. Topics include: ventilation strategies, design and retrofit methods, calculation techniques, standards and regulations, measurement methods, indoor air quality and energy implications etc. Entries are based on articles and reports published in journals, internal publications and research reports, produced both by university departments and by building research institutions throughout the world. AIRBASE has grown and evolved over many years (1979 to present day, over 22000 references and 16000 documents available online). For most of the references, the full document is also available online.

The AIVC website includes a protected content feature that provides access to AIRBASE. Access to the protected content is free of charge but requires you to register first.


 
Due to the wind induced pressure, different results may be obtained if the inside-outside pressure difference is measured across different locations on the building envelope, i.e.
Jiří Novák, Czech Republic
Air filters installed in ventilation systems face various types of aerosols during their service life, both in residential and in commercial buildings.
Jesús Marval, Luis Medina, Emanuele Norata, Paolo Tronville, Italy
Uncertainties in airtightness measured using fan pressurization test should not be defined by the scattering of the points around the line defined using ordinary least square method anymore.
Martin Prignon, Arnaud Dawans, Geoffrey van Moeseke, Belgium
This study is a first large-scale analysis of the performance of a cloud connected and smart residential mechanical extract ventilation (MEV) system based on field data.
Bavo De Maré, Stijn Germonpré, Jelle Laverge, Frederik Losfeld, Ivan Pollet, Steven Vandekerckhove, Belgium
Building airtightness requirements are becoming more and more common in Europe (Leprince, Carrié, & Kapsalaki, 2017). However, airtight buildings require an efficient ventilation system to ensure good indoor air quality.
Sylvain Berthault, Valérie Leprince, France
Buildings account for approximately 40 % of energy use in the European Union, as well as in the United States.
Maria Justo Alonso, W. Stuart Dols, Hans Martin Mathisen, Norway
Since the 1970s, many authors have discussed the impact of poor airtightness on building energy use, indoor air quality, building damage, or noise transmission.
Adeline Bailly Mélois, Anh Dung Tran, Mohamed El Mankibi, François Rémi Carrié, Bassam Moujalled,Gaëlle Guyot, France
Studies in the Netherlands show that ventilation systems of dwellings don’t comply with building regulations. The main shortcoming is insufficient ventilation. This applies to both the house as a whole as to individual rooms.
Wouter Borsboom, Wim Kornaat, Pieter van Beek, Niek-Jan Bink, Timothy Lanooy, The Netherlands
This study aims to evaluate the performances of a VMI, a demand-controlled mechanical supply ventilation system, in an experimental house, in terms of indoor air quality (IAQ), energy performance and thermal comfort.
Clement Laffeter, Xavier Faure, Michele Potard, Claude Bardoul, Julien Escaich, Ophelie Ouvrier Bonnaz, Etienne Wurtz, France
The indoor thermal comfort and air quality in classrooms have become of interest worldwide, predominantly because of their influence on children’s health, learning performance and productivity.
Shamila Haddad, Afroditi Synnefa, Miguel Ángel Padilla Marcos, Riccardo Paolini, Deo Prasad, Mattheos Santamouris, Australia
Within the ventilation principle of buildings, the outdoor air is considered as a source of fresh, "clean" air.
Joris Van Herreweghe, Samuel Caillou, Tom Haerinck, Johan Van Dessel, Belgium
Building airtightness tests have become very common in several countries, either to comply with minimum requirements of regulations or programs, or to justify input values in calculation methods.
Dimitrios Kraniotis, Arnab Chaudhuri , Norway
Buildings typically are expected to provide their inhabitants with the opportunity to influence the indoor environment using various control devices. These include, for example, windows, luminaires, radiators, and shading elements.
Ardeshir Mahdavi, Helene Teufl, Christiane Berger, Austria
Gas-phase air cleaning methodologies have been considered as an attractive and cost-benefit alternative, and supplement to the traditional ventilation systems securing that air quality in buildings is meeting the prescribed standards.
Pawel Wargocki, Denmark
Indoor carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations have been used for decades to evaluate indoor air quality (IAQ) and ventilation.
Andrew Persily, Brian J. Polidoro , United States of America
Highly energy efficient buildings such as ones built to the Passive House standard, require a very airtight building envelope and the installation of a mechanical ventilation with heat recovery (MVHR).
Gabriel Rojas, Austria
The last decades big steps have been made on the road to develop and design energy neutral buildings.
Ad van der Aa, Per Heiselberg, Willem de Gids, The Netherlands
Many test methods exist for evaluating gaseous-contaminant filtration media, and a few for evaluating functional filters and other devices. These test methods are designed primarily for use in product quality control and to rank products.
Paolo Tronville, Italy
Combustion appliances are used in many buildings to provide space heating and domestic hot water.
Xavier Kuborn, Sébastien Pecceu, Belgium
In recent years, not only the residence but also the effort of health promotion by improving the social environment including the working and the regional environment has attracted attention.
Yuko Abe, Yasuyuki Shiraishi, Toshiharu Ikaga, Yoshihisa Fujino, Japan

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