AIVC - Air Infiltration and Ventilation Centre

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thermal comfort

Indoor climate

Describes expectations people have of indoor climate. Notes that the quality of indoor climate has often taken second place to fashionable architectural and material considerations. Refers to concern for improved environment and awareness of formaldehyde, radon and other pollutants and the need for correct ventilation to achieve derived air quality. Provides guidelines for air quality, and the thermal environment in both housing and working premises.

Case study of a sick building

Demonstrates that complaints by office staff about their physical environment are not necessarily caused by physical deficiencies. Trying to reduce the level of complaints by adjusting heating ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems can therefore be an unrewarding task. Greater attention needs to be placed on - communications between management, those responsible for running HVAC systems and staff. Staff need the feeling that they can influence, if not control, their environment. Staff should also have more realistic expectations about their thermal comfort.

Indoor climate problems in a kindergarten, and how they were solved

An account is given of what the kindergarten staff wrongly believed caused the problems and what measures they carried out in an attempt to solve them. On the spot measurements showed however what the real main cause of the problems was. Results from the comprehensive measurements of CO2 concentrations andother ventilation performance criteria in a room occupied by 12 children and 3adults are then presented.

An office environment - problems and improvements

The employees in a large office in Trondheim were complaining about headache, tiredness, sickness, allergic reactions in eye and nose, dry skin, respiratory diseases etc., and as usual they believed that their inconvenience was due tothe ventilating system. However, preliminary investigations did not verify this assumption, although it was evident that the heating and ventilating system was part of the problems. Measures included reduction of room temperature, antistatic treatment of carpets, and replacement of noisy ceiling diffusers.

A comparison of an automated continuous formaldehyde analyser with passive dosimeters

A microprocessor-controlled, five point, all-teflon sequential air sampling system interfaced to a continuous formaldehyde analyser, the CEA model TGM 555 Air Monitor which uses the pararosaniline colorimetric method was used tomeasure the seaso

A prospective study of the health and comfort changes among tenants after retrofitting of their flats

The prospective study included two groups, a study group, which had retrofitting of their flats, and a control group not exposed to environmental changes in their homes. The results clearly demonstrated a number of positive effects of the replac

Indoor climate Inomhusklimat

Describes expectations people have of indoor climate. Notes that the quality of indoor climate has often taken second place to fashionable architectural and material considerations. Refers to concern for improved environment and awareness of formaldehyde, radon and other pollutants and the need for correct ventilation to achieve derived air quality. Proves guidelines for air quality and the thermal indoor climate in both housing and working premises.

Industrial ventilation needs pinpointed by heat relief study.

Describes a recent survey of a large ink manufacturing works in an effort to solve thermal comfort problems by improving the ventilation of specific areas of the plant. Six buildings were investigated. Illustrates them diagrammatically and explains the ventilation solutions recommended. Explains the base of the estimated construction and installation costs.

Health and comfort aspects of indoor climate. Helse - og trivselaspekter med inneklima.

Health problems have occurred after the introduction of building regulations with stricter requirements for airtightness. Reviews work done to improve problems associated with the thermal environment and human heat balance, building and installation conditions; the chemical environment and human awareness of pollutants; medical aspects; radon radiation; microbiological conditions; energy savings, air quality and efficient ventilation; thermal insulation and airtightness; static electricity and toxic gases from building materials and the problems of low ventilation rates.

Building performance evaluation based on comfort criteria.

The Fanger Comfort Equation is coupled to a building simulation model. Discusses some factors related to thermal comfort. Incorporates variables influencing comfort as subroutines in the main thermal analysis program. If the temperature calculated is significantly different from the prevailing air temperature, amelioration measures such as changes in the rate of ventilation (natural or mechanical) or conditioning of air are determined by thesubroutine CONAIR.

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