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thermal comfort

Thermal comfort, IAQ and Energy use in Bedrooms

The research question of this report is “Is it possible to save energy by lowering the bedroom temperatures in winter”. In this paper first the literature on optimum sleeping temperatures is investigated. Then bedroom temperatures and CO2 levels in a cold week in March 2018 are investigated in 16 bedrooms of students of the Master course Technoledge Climate Desing in 2017-2018 of the faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment of the Delft University of Technology. This study shows that it must be possible to save energy by lowering the bedroom temperature in winter.

Smart monitoring of ventilation system performance with IEQ sensor networks

The recent development of affordable and quite accurate temperature sensors and Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) sensors has led to a growing interest in continuous indoor climate monitoring. Not just amongst scientists and engineers but also amongst building owners, developers and e.g. architects interested in boosting our buildings’ health and comfort qualities.

Validation of a Digital Twin with Measurement Data

The research objectives of this study are to develop and validate a detailed simulation model of a test cell which was used to measure heat balances for comfort evaluation. 

Ventilative cooling in a school building: evaluation of the measured performances

The test lecture rooms of KU Leuven Ghent Technology Campus are one the demonstration cases of IEA EBC Annex 62: Ventilative Cooling. This nZEB school building is realised on top of an existing university building and contains 2 large lecture rooms for maximum 80 students with a floor area of 140m² each. An all air system with balanced mechanical ventilation is installed for ventilation, heating and cooling.

Indoor Environment in Sickroom with Ceiling Induction Diffusers and Measuring Method of Ventilation Effectiveness Using Tracer Gas

In order to provide patients with a high quality indoor environment and ensure a pleasant working place for medical care personnel, thermal environment and indoor air quality are regarded as two of the most important requirements. 

A study of running set-points and user IEQ satisfaction perspectives in the Norwegian commercial building stock

Norwegian building regulations refer to the NS-EN 15251 and the NS-ISO 7730 to define indoor climate criteria in new buildings. For example, the standards prescribe a temperature band of 20-26°C for a normal office situation. Any HVAC engineer or facility manager would however willingly state that office buildings in practice are run with a much smaller temperature dead-band, and that building occupants would complain if temperatures were as high as 26°C.

Indoor Air Quality and Thermal Comfort, in Irish Retrofitted Energy Efficient Homes

Indoor air quality and thermal comfort was measured in 14 three-bedroom, semi-detached, cavity wall naturally-ventilated homes during the winter following an energy efficient retrofit. As part of the energy retrofit, homes received new windows and doors, an upgraded heating system, attic insulation, and wall vents, as well as pumped beaded wall insulation into three external walls.

A longitudinal field study of thermal comfort and air quality in naturally ventilated office buildings in UK

Natural ventilation has the potential to provide cooling and fresh air and cut 40% of the total energy consumption of European office buildings. While in the milder seasons natural ventilation is an obvious low-energy choice, if poorly designed it can cause overheating in summer and poor air quality in winter. In order to promote the use and design of naturally ventilated (NV) buildings, it is therefore important to understand how current NV buildings perform in terms of thermal comfort and indoor air quality.

Towards Real-Time Model-Based Monitoring and Adoptive Controlling of Indoor Thermal Comfort

Thermal comfort is an important aspect of the building design and indoor climate control as modern man spends most of the day indoors. Conventional indoor climate design and control approaches are based on static thermal comfort models that views the building occupants as passive recipients of their thermal environment. Assuming that people have relatively constant range of biological comfort requirements, and that the indoor environmental variables should be controlled to conform to that constant range.

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