AIVC - Air Infiltration and Ventilation Centre

Search form

EBC

You are here

Home

house

Window airtightness and its influence on energy saving and minimum required ventilation.

Presents method for establishing conditions and an acceptance criterion for window air-tightness testing in relation to average energy (heating) saving per winter. Uses wind velocity data from israeli meteorological station of Ashdod to demonstrate difference between various methods of evaluating design wind velocity. Uses 41 different typical dwellings to determine unique criterion for acceptable air leakage under test conditions which ensures average of 1 air change per hour in most Israeli dwellings.

Ventilation measurements in houses and the influence of wall ventilators.

Using nitrous oxide as a tracer, the author made 390 measurements of ventilation rates in seven closed rooms of six houses, in Melbourne, Australia. Half of the observations were taken when the wall ventilators were sealed, in order to explore their influence on room ventilation. Results for each room, grouped in ranges of wind direction and according to whether ventilators were open or closed, are shown as regression curveson plots of ventilation rate against wind speed. The ventilators are shown to have only a slight effect on ventilation.

Analysis of factors affecting the extent of air leakage of one family house. Analys ar ofrivillig ventilation i smahus

Reports theoretical and experimental calculations of heat balance of 5 houses. Discusses the extent of air leakage and various factors contributing to heat losses, particularly effects of wind and winter temperatures. Normal air leakage is 0. 5-0.7 air changes/h, mainly through chimneys, air outlets, window, and door cracks. Air leakage of floor, door, and roofs is 0.1-0.2 air changes/h. in winter, temperature differences have the same influence on ventilation as wind velocity. Measurements in attics show 3 air changes/h. This is largely dependent on wind velocity.

A study of humidity variations in canadian houses

Gives survey of humidity in Canadian homes indicating that humidity depends primarily on outside conditions but is influenced by the ventilation habits of the occupants and moisture storage by hygroscopic material. The difference between indoor and outdoor humidity ratios gave an estimated ventilation rate of 0.44 charges per hour. Resultant indoor relative humidity level is between 25 and 30% on average and approaches the maximum humidity attainable without condensation on double-glazed windows.

Airtightness and ventilation Tathet och ventilation

Describes measurements of airtightness and ventilation in prefabricated 'modulent' houses, 25 single-storey with habitable lofts and 8 single-storey, all with mechanical extract systems. Measurements used pressure method and tracer gas in houses with different airtightness, types of window, windproofing and facing materials. Possibility of presetting ventilation terminals and fans to achieve recommended airflows was investigated. Treatsrelationship between wind, temperature and airtightness. Notes number of shortcomings in ventilation system discovered during investigation.

Air infiltration measurements in a four-bedroom townhouse using sulphur hexafluoride as a tracer gas.

Reports measurements in title. House was contained in environmental chamber with control over inside and outside temperature with essentially no wind velocity. Observes familiar correlation between inside-outside temperature difference andinfiltration rate, and effect of sealing doors and ducts underconditions of negligible wind velocity. Compares different methods of collecting air samples for analysis and compares SF6 measurements with air exchange rates imposed on the house by means of a centrifugal blower.

Measurement of air leakage characteristics of house enclosures.

Reports results of series of tests on 6 single-family houses to determine rates of overall leakage through windows, doors, walls and ceilings. Uses vane- axial fan to reduce pressures inside house and measure flowrate and resultant pressure differences across house enclosure. Purpose of tests was to assist in eliminating rates of air infiltration in houses.

Window opening in houses: an estimate of the reasons and magnitude of the energy wasted.

Detailed analysis of actual space heating requirements shows a much higher consumption in mild weather than predicted. Attributes this mainly to casual window opening, which accounts for 30% of total energy used. This factor will be greater in well-insulated houses where ventilation loss is proportionately greater. Examination of motives for window opening suggests high humidity levels are most likely. The trend to man-made fibres in soft furnishings with low moisture storage capacity accentuates humidity problem.

Air change rates in buildings. Byginingers luftskifte

Summarises results of research project comprising survey of air tightness and natural air change rates in various types of residential building. Briefly describes equipment for pressurization tests and tracer gas measurements. Compares properties, range of measurement and cost of 5 different tracer gases. Provides some results from measurements in 53 single family houses and 28 flats. 9 of tested dwellings had their tightness improved and supplementary measurements made.

Economic ventilation of single family houses. Ekonomisk ventilation i smahus.

Outlines necessary ventilation rates for an occupied room. Discusses natural ventilation of a room through openings in the ceiling. Discusses natural draught ventilation for single family houses, combined natural draught and mechanical ventilation, mechanical fresh air ventilation based on a central duct, fortuitous ventilation caused by air infiltration and leakage. Compares natural and mechanical ventilation. Considers supplyair systems for single family houses, warm air heating and possibilities for heat recovery.

Pages