AIVC - Air Infiltration and Ventilation Centre

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Field studies of dependence of air infiltration on outside temperature and wind.

Expresses air infiltration rate measured using tracer gas in 2 similar town houses in terms of wind speed, wind direction, indoor-outdoor temperature difference, average rate of boiler firing and fraction of time that doors are open. Method yielded reproducible rates of air infiltration within 0.1 air exchanges per hour in any single one-week run once outside temperature, wind speed and wind direction were allowed for. States results partly reveal set of physical principles determining house air exchange rates which are so far poorly understood.

The effects of ventilation and building design factors on the risk of condensation and mould growth in dwellings.

Presents calculations of mean temperatures and relative humidities , shown graphically for three typical housing types assuming different heat and moisture inputs: 1) whole house uniformly heated with moisture from household activities uniformly distributed; 2) kitchen at constant temperature with high moisture emission rate; 3) unheated bedroom with two occupants assumed to be in thermalequilibrium with a room below at 15 c. Concludes that there is a certain critical amount of heat needed to give a relative humidity of less than 70% and thus avoid the danger of mould growth .

Measurement of air tightness of houses.

Describes pressurization method of measuring air leakage using a fan installed through an open window. Gives results of survey of 24 houses. Humidity, meteorological parameters, indoor particulate levels, measured equivalent leakage areas and other information were recorded. Finds that tight houses tend to havehigher humidity, that leaky houses require more heating energy and that houses where smoking takes place have higher air pollution levels than others.

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