AIVC - Air Infiltration and Ventilation Centre

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air leakage

Influence of building air tightness on ventilation losses.

The Building Air Tightness is an important parameter on ventilation systems performanceand energy losses.Yet, the total amount of leakage is as important on performances as their effective positionin the room.Some calculations have been run according to prEN 13465 from TC156 WG2 for differentbuildings (single house, dwellings and commercial buildings) varying air tightness, valueand repartition for different ventilation systems (natural, mechanical exhaust, mechanicalexhaust and supply).All these calculations have been compared focusing on ventilation losses during heatingseason in Paris.So

Effect of control strategies on ventilation system performance.

Dynamic computer simulations were used to compare residential ventilation methods to identifyan approach that would improve indoor air quality with minimum energy penalty while maintainingcomfort.

Air leakage through automatic doors.

A method has been developed to estimate the air leakage through high-use automatic doors. This air leakage is specified as a function of the rate of use of the door, the door geometry, and the pressure difference across the door. Two studies were carried out to obtain these results. One was a laboratory study of the discharge coefficients of doors of various geometries. The other was a field study of the times when automatic doors are open as a function of use.

Myths about building envelopes.

It is often assumed that commercial and institutional buildings are fairly airtight and that envelope air leakage does not have a significant impact on energy consumption and indoor air quality in these buildings. Furthermore, it is assumed that more recently constructed buildings are tighter than older buildings. However, very little data is available on the airtightness of building envelopes in commercial and institutional buildings.

Resolving duct leakage claims.

This report is from a study of the performance of eight exhaust systems of a large medical center in Tennessee. The mechanical contractor of the project initiated this study when confronted with a claim of unacceptable deficiencies in all building exhaust systems. These systems were reportedly exhausting 32% to 43% less than design airflow as a consequence of excessive leakage in the duct system.

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