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Durable airtightness in single-family dwellings: field measurements and analysis

This study presents a comparison of air leakage measurements collected recently (November 2013 to March 2014) with two sets of prior data collected between 2001-2003 from 17 new homes located near Atlanta, GA, and 17 homes near Boise, ID that were weatherized in 2007-2008. The purpose of the comparison is to determine if there are changes to the airtightness of building envelopes over time. Durability of building envelope is important to new homes that are increasingly built with improved levels of airtightness.

The need for structured air leakage databases in energy conservation in buildings policies

25 May 2012 | The need for structured air leakage databases in energy conservation in buildings policies

Prediction of air quality considering the concealed air leaks of houses

In this study, the characteristics of the movement of chemical compounds in the concealed spaces and indoor spaces in houses were investigated using building cut models and a simulation program Fresh2006. The equivalent leakage areas in the concealed spaces were measured using cut models of wooden structures: a common wooden structure, an improved wooden structure and a wooden (2 inch x 4 inch) stud structure.

French policy for shelter-in-place: Airtightness measurements on indoor rooms

Accidental dispersion of toxic gas clouds may occur around industrial platforms or during hazardous materials transportation. In case of such a toxic risk, the best protection strategy is to remain inside a building and seek refuge in an airtight room identified as “shelter” until the toxic cloud has finally been swept off. This strategy called “passive shelter-in-place” also includes obstructing all external openings and turning off all mechanical ventilation systems

Preliminary analysis of U.S residential air leakage database v.2011

Air leakage and other diagnostic measurements are being added to LBNL’s Residential Diagnostics Database (ResDB). We describe the sources of data that amount to more than 80,000 blower door measurements. We present summary statistics of selected parameters, such as floor area and year built. We compare the house characteristics of new additions to ResDB with prior data.

Effect of Party Wall Permeability on Estimations of Infiltration from Air Leakage

The importance of reducing adventitious infiltration in order to save energy is highlighted by the relevant building standards of many countries.  This operational infiltration is often inferred via the measurement of the air leakage rate at a pressure differential of 50 Pascals.  Some building codes, such as the UK’s Standard Assessment Procedure, assume a simple relationship between the air leakage rate and mean infiltration rate during the heating season, the so-called leakage-infiltration ratio, which is scaled to account for the physical and environmental properties of a dwelling.  The

Applying Large Datasets to Developing a Better Understanding of Air Leakage Measurement in Homes

Air tightness is an important property of building envelopes.  It is a key factor in determining infiltration and related wall-performance properties such as indoor air quality, maintainability and moisture balance.  Air leakage in U.S. houses consumes roughly 1/3 of the HVAC energy but provides most of the ventilation used to control IAQ.  There are several methods for measuring air tightness that may result in different values and sometimes quite different uncertainties.

Advanced Duct Sealant Testing

Duct leakage is a major source of energy loss in residential buildings. Most duct leakage occurs at the connections to registers, plenums, or branches in the duct system. At each of these connections, a method of sealing the duct system is required. Typical sealing methods include tapes or mastics applied around the joints in the system. Field examinations of duct systems have shown that taped seals tend to fail over extended periods of time. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been testing sealant durability for several years.

Air Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report

Most dwellings in the United States are ventilated primarily through leaks in the building shell (i.e., infiltration) rather than by whole-house mechanical ventilation systems. Consequently, quantification of envelope air-tightness is critical to determining how much energy is being lost through infiltration and how much infiltration is contributing toward ventilation requirements. Envelope air tightness and air leakage can be determined from fan pressurization measurements with a blower door. Tens of thousands of unique fan pressurization measurements have been made of U.S.

Analysis of U.S. Residential Air Leakage Database

The air leakage of a building envelope can be determined from fan pressurization measurements with a blower door. More than 70,000 air leakage measurements have been compiled into a database. In addition to air leakage, the database includes other important characteristics of the dwellings tested, such as floor area, year built, and location. There are also data for some houses on the presence of heating ducts, and floor/basement construction type. The purpose of this work is to identify house characteristics that can be used to predict air leakage.

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