AIVC - Air Infiltration and Ventilation Centre

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Estimation of Air Leakage Sizes in Building Envelope using High-Frequency Acoustic Impulse Response Technique

Heating energy in buildings represents a significant proportion of the total global energy consumption. Uncontrolled airflow through the building envelope contributes significantly to its energy losses.  

Airtightness and energy impact of air infiltration in residential buildings in Spain

Addressing the airtightness of the building envelope is key to achieve thermal comfort, good performance of ventilation systems and to avoid excessive energy consumption. Previous studies have estimated an energy impact on infiltration on the heating demand between 2 and 20 kWh/(m2·y) in regions with temperate climates. In Spain, this issue has not yet been addressed in depth. This study aims to assess the energy impact of uncontrolled air flows through the building envelope in residential buildings in Spain.

Exist’air: airtightness measurement campaign and ventilation evaluation in 117 pre-2005 French dwellings

Between 2017 and 2018, the Centre for Studies and Expertise on Risks, the Environment, Mobility and Planning (Cerema) organized an airtightness measurement campaign in 117 multi-family collective and single-family French dwellings. These dwellings were built before 2005, that is, before the release in 2005 of the fifth French thermal regulation for new dwellings, that was the first to introduce specific requirements for airtightness.

Moisture impact on dimensional changes and air leakage in wooden buildings

Wood is a hygroscopic material, it has the ability to adsorb or desorb water in response to the ambient relative humidity. Thus, the ambient air will affect the moisture content of the wood, and in turn, the dimension of the wood. If the wood itself is part of the air barrier in a construction, the shrinking and expansion can create gaps in the construction, for example in the window sill. In case of an air barrier consisting of a foil, the joints in the foil can be clamped by wooden joists, or the foil can be taped to wooden part.

Experimental study on the measurement of Building Infiltration and Air Leakage rates (at 4 and 50 Pa) by means of Tracer Gas methods, Blower Door and the novel Pulse technique in a Detached UK Home

Air infiltration contributes to a heat loss typically representing up to one third of the heating demand of a building. The building airtightness, also quantified as air leakage, is the fundamental building property that impacts infiltration. The steady (de)pressurization method (blower door) is the widely accepted standard process for measuring building air leakage. However, this method requires the enclosure to be pressurised to a typical range of 10-60 Pa, which is not physically representative of the pressures experienced by buildings under natural conditions.

Numerical and experimental identification of factors influencing the pressure homogeneity during an airtightness test in a large building

Airtightness is the most important property of building envelopes to understand the ventilation. Airtightness refers to the flow measurement through the building envelope as a function of pressure across the building envelope. This relationship often fits to a power law, which is the most common way of expressing data. However, pressure homogeneity during airtightness tests can crop up, especially in large buildings.

Preliminary analysis results of Spanish residential air leakage database

The air leakage impact on energy performance in buildings has already been broadly studied in USA, Canada and most European countries. However, there is a lack of knowledge in Mediterranean countries regarding airtightness. An extensive study has been carried out in order to characterize the envelope of the existing housing stock in Spain. Preliminary results of more than 401 dwellings tested are shown. The sample includes different typologies, year of construction and climate zones. Blower door tests were performed and thermal imaging was used to locate leakage paths.   

Impact of airtightness on the heat demand of passive houses in central European climate

Excessive air leakage through the building envelope increases the infiltration heat loss and therefore lowers the energy efficiency. Therefore, very good airtightness is required in case of well insulated buildings equipped with a mechanical ventilation system with heat recovery (e.g. n50 < 0.6 h-1 for passive houses). Although the building industry has progressively adopted strategies to comply with such strict limits, it is still important to study how and how much the airtightness influences the energy efficiency of different types of buildings in different climatic conditions.

Air leakage variations due to changes in moisture content in wooden construction - magnitudes and consequences

The airtightness of buildings is important for several reasons, such as being a prerequisite for low-energy buildings and for a healthy indoor air quality (without i.e. mould or radon). The airtightness of buildings can vary over time and investigations are made on these variations due to moisture induced movements in wooden constructions, and subsequent consequences, using both measurements and numerical simulations.

Air leakage of defects in the vapour barrier of compact roofs

The harsh Norwegian climate requires buildings designed according to high standards. The airtightness of the building envelope is crucial to attain an energy efficient building and to avoid moisture problems. A considerable part of building defects registered in the SINTEF Building defects archive are related to compact roofs.

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