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Potential of mechanical ventilation for reducing overheating risks in retrofitted Danish apartment buildings from the period 1850-1890 – A simulation-based study

Advancing energy efficient renovation solutions in buildings necessitate adopting high-insulation and airtightness to avoid heat loss through transmission and infiltration, which can result in overheating. Elevated indoor temperatures have a highly negative effect on building occupants’ health, wellbeing and productivity. With the possibility of remote working, people spend more time at home, and therefore addressing the elevated indoor temperatures and the overheating risks in residential buildings proves to be essential.

Experimental and Numerical Study of a Building Retrofitting Solution Combining Phase Change Material Wallboards and Night Ventilation

The interest in phase change materials (PCMs) as a solution for thermal energy storage has been growing for the last decades. It is clear that PCMs are promising for reducing the summer heat peaks without increasing the energy demand for cooling. A new modular, reversible, lightweight retrofitting system was developed and integrated in a real size experimental test cell.

Ventilative cooling effectiveness in office buildings: a parametrical simulation

Controlled Natural Ventilation (CNV) is one of the potential most effective passive cooling technique to reduce cooling needs of buildings in temperate-hot climate zones. However, a correct balance amid internal heat capacity, thermal insulation, and net opening area is important to achieve optimal results. The present paper shows results from an original simulation process carried out within the Course “ICT in building design” of the Master degree programme ICT4SS (ICT for smart societies) at the Politecnico di Torino.

Characterising Window Opening Behaviour of Occupants Using Machine Learning Models

Occupants control indoor environments to meet their individual needs for comfort. The control of window is the most common natural ventilation method influencing indoor environment as well as the energy use of the buildings to maintain a suitable environment. Therefore a better understanding of window control behaviour of the occupants has significant implication to enhance occupant comfort with minimal energy consumption. The objective of this study was to identify an appropriate algorithm and variables to develop a predictive model for window control.

Energy analysis for balanced ventilation units from field studies

Balanced ventilation units are well known to provide a sufficient amount of fresh air in residential buildings in a controlled way, without relying on ever-changing naturally driven forces. During colder periods, heat recovery ensures a reduction of the ventilation heating load. Outside the colder periods, recovery is reduced or shut off automatically, providing mechanical ventilative cooling. During warmer periods, the recovery is used again to provide a comfortably cool supply of fresh air.

Free cooling of low energy buildings with ground source heat pump system and bidirectional ventilation

Earlier field measurements in Low Energy Buildings have shown that excess temperatures can easily occur during summertime in well-insulated houses, also in northern part of Europe. If a ground source heat pump is used for heating and there is a bidirectional ventilation system, the borehole can be used for free cooling in summertime and the chilled air can be distributed by the ventilation system. In this study, a simulation of a single family nZEB located in the Swedish city Gothenburg was conducted.

Ventilative cooling and improved indoor air quality through the application of engineered Earth Tube systems, in a Canadian climate

This paper will present the context and application of earth tube systems for the provision of ventilative cooling and general make-up air in the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) sector of the built environment; with a focus on case studies in Canada.  

Numerical Assessment of the Influence of Heat Loads on the Performance of Temperature-Controlled Airflow in an Operating Room

Airborne bacteria-carrying particles (BCPs) in an operating room (OR) can cause post-operative infections in the patients. The ventilation system in the OR is crucial in removing or diluting airborne BCPs. This study numerically assessed a newly developed OR ventilation scheme – temperature-controlled airflow (TAF), with special focus on the influence of heat loads on the airflow and BCPs concentration. TAF supplies clean air at different temperature levels to different zones and establishes a high-momentum downward airflow pattern over the operating table.

Resilient Demand Control Ventilation system for dwellings

Demand Control Ventilation strategy resilience is analysed through the envelope leakage distribution. Global building envelope leakage has great impact on energy consumption and targeted tightness values are systematically decreased in the several thermal regulations around the world. This leads to a more controlled ventilation system, but also to a more sensitive system to the leakage distribution. Considering fixed test cases with known entry data, two types of relative humidity based DCV strategy are analysed through their response to randomized envelope leakage distribution.

Hybrid ventilation systems enslaved by IAQ sensors

This paper presents a new concept of ventilation system for residential building, based on a hybrid ventilation system, mainly control by weather conditions and IAQ sensors to optimize exhaust airflows rates, for the purpose of improving global building energy performance and improving the quality of life of the occupiers.

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