AIVC - Air Infiltration and Ventilation Centre

Search form

EBC

You are here

Home

EU

Use of low cost IAQ sensors?

The difficulty in measuring IAQ indicators like VOCs and particles, lies in the multiplicity of the composition of these pollutants. Analysis of the responses of some low cost IAQ sensors when subjected to real sources of pollution shows that they do not react homogeneously, due to their sensitivity and post-treatments. These sensors can be used by consumers to understand the effect of their actions on the evolution of IAQ indicators, not to rely directly on the values displayed.

Measurement issues of air flow at air terminal devices and perspectives

The different methods for air flow rate measurement at air terminal devices are presented in this overview, such as van anemometer with a cone, small velocity probe (thermal probe or small vane anemometer), compensation method, etc. Several measurement methods are available on the market at highly variable cost. However some of these methods are suspected to lack reliability.  

A review of European standards related to measurement at air terminal devices

Two European standards EN 16211:2015 and EN 12599:2012 describe measurement methods for air flow. 
The methods can be used at supply or exhaust air terminal devices, ATDs, or in ducts. 
Both standards include the methods air flow hoods, bag and reference pressure method. EN 12599 presents a compensation method with a test chamber and the effective area, Ak-method. EN 16211 also includes two types of air flow hood compensation methods. 

Measurements of perceived indoor air quality

Occupants in non-industrial indoor environments should decide whether the indoor air quality is acceptable or not. This paper describes the method by which the assessments of acceptability of air quality can be used for measuring short-term sensory effects on humans caused by indoor exposures. It also describes how this method can be applied to estimate the perceived indoor air quality used as a design criteria for the ventilation of buildings.

Background and Objective of IEA-EBC Annex 78. Supplementing Ventilation with Gas-phase Air Cleaning, Implementation and Energy Implications

The proposed Annex should bring researchers and industry together to investigate the possible energy benefits by using gas phase air cleaners (partial substitute for ventilation) and establish procedures for improving indoor air quality or reduced amount of ventilation by gas phase air cleaning. The project shall also establish a test method for air cleaners that considers the influence on the perceived air quality and substances in the indoor air.

Indoor Environmental Quality – Global Alliance: The Next Decade

This workshop session will consist of a series of presentations by members of the Board for the Indoor Environmental Quality – Global Alliance (IEQ-GA). The AIVC is one of the founding members of the IEG-GA, and its representatives have participated in the formation of the Global Alliance as well as active members in planning for the next stage of its development. The Alliance is expected to be an independent international NGO whose members are public or non-profit entities that are involved with advancing knowledge on common indoor environmental quality issues.

Indoor Environmental Quality – Global Alliance & the AIVC

As one of the founding partners of the IEQ-GA, the networking with other organisations within the global alliance is for AIVC very important.  
Whereas AIVC has primary a focus on good indoor air quality (by using ventilation) and good thermal comfort during warm periods (by using intensive ventilation), it is clear that an overall approach to indoor environmental quality is important.  

Indoor Environmental Quality Global Alliance (IEQ-GA): History and Future

In these three presentations, we review the origins and history of the Indoor Environmental Quality Global Alliance, AIVC’s view of the potential value of IEQ-GA, and directions it is taking and may take over the next decade. 

Temperature, draft and ventilation efficiency of room based decentralised heat recovery ventilation systems

Mechanical ventilation systems with heat recovery are considered the most optimal systems for residential ventilation. This research focuses on decentralized ventilation which do not need any ducting. Therefore, this system is very suitable for use in retrofitting. The performance criteria of these units are similar to those of central systems. A recuperative and two regenerative ventilation units were tested in a double climate chamber where temperature, air velocity and contaminant concentration were monitored on a fixed 80 point grid.

Energy performance of demand controlled mechanical extract ventilation systems vs mechanical ventilation systems with heat recovery in operational conditions : Results of 12 months in situ-measurements at Kortrijk ECO-Life community

In a recently built zero-carbon neighborhood, demand controlled exhaust ventilation systems (DCMEV) and mechanical ventilation systems with heat recovery (MVHR) are compared under operational conditions, with focus on the energy performance of both systems. The analysis is based on automatically gathered monitoring data, complementary in situ measurements and occupants surveys. 

Pages