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Indoor Environmental Quality – Global Alliance: The Next Decade

This workshop session will consist of a series of presentations by members of the Board for the Indoor Environmental Quality – Global Alliance (IEQ-GA). The AIVC is one of the founding members of the IEG-GA, and its representatives have participated in the formation of the Global Alliance as well as active members in planning for the next stage of its development. The Alliance is expected to be an independent international NGO whose members are public or non-profit entities that are involved with advancing knowledge on common indoor environmental quality issues.

Indoor Environmental Quality – Global Alliance & the AIVC

As one of the founding partners of the IEQ-GA, the networking with other organisations within the global alliance is for AIVC very important.  
Whereas AIVC has primary a focus on good indoor air quality (by using ventilation) and good thermal comfort during warm periods (by using intensive ventilation), it is clear that an overall approach to indoor environmental quality is important.  

Indoor Environmental Quality Global Alliance (IEQ-GA): History and Future

In these three presentations, we review the origins and history of the Indoor Environmental Quality Global Alliance, AIVC’s view of the potential value of IEQ-GA, and directions it is taking and may take over the next decade. 

Temperature, draft and ventilation efficiency of room based decentralised heat recovery ventilation systems

Mechanical ventilation systems with heat recovery are considered the most optimal systems for residential ventilation. This research focuses on decentralized ventilation which do not need any ducting. Therefore, this system is very suitable for use in retrofitting. The performance criteria of these units are similar to those of central systems. A recuperative and two regenerative ventilation units were tested in a double climate chamber where temperature, air velocity and contaminant concentration were monitored on a fixed 80 point grid.

Energy performance of demand controlled mechanical extract ventilation systems vs mechanical ventilation systems with heat recovery in operational conditions : Results of 12 months in situ-measurements at Kortrijk ECO-Life community

In a recently built zero-carbon neighborhood, demand controlled exhaust ventilation systems (DCMEV) and mechanical ventilation systems with heat recovery (MVHR) are compared under operational conditions, with focus on the energy performance of both systems. The analysis is based on automatically gathered monitoring data, complementary in situ measurements and occupants surveys. 

Improving the usability and performance of heat recovery ventilation systems in practice

The use of heat recovery ventilation systems is becoming more and more common. It is clear that these systems contribute to energy efficiency and good indoor air quality. Still there is room for improvement. Analyses by monitoring and modelling have uncovered drawbacks and flaws, especially for the use and application of HR ventilation in highly energy efficient dwellings. This paper will deal with these issues, turning them into suggestions to improve HR ventilation systems. 

Subjective Evaluation for Perceived Air Pollution Caused by Human Bioeffluents

The concentration of carbon dioxide is used as an important index of indoor air quality representative of body odor or bioeffluents in Japan. In the construction field of Japan, there is a CO2 concentration standard of a thousand ppm or less. However, property of occupants (such as sex, age and nationality) has non-nogligiblw effect on the room odor environment. Thus the standard of ventilation air volume should be decided suiting up for building use and occupants.

A use case of data analysis for assessing Indoor Air Quality indicators

Product connectivity makes products and systems remotely controllable and possibly interoperable with other devices in the house. 
The most common way to achieve this interoperability is to connect these devices locally. On the other hand, products may also be cloud-connected, which allows an easier and seamless interoperability between devices. Hence, data are collected and stored in the cloud. As soon as the measured data is sent to the cloud, large set of data are available and can be anonymously retrieved and statistically analyzed. 

Economics of Indoor Air Quality

Buildings represent a major end use of energy throughout the world and are typically the dominant sector for electricity.   The use of that energy is to provide buildings services, the most important of which is Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ).  Heating and air conditioning systems typically handle the thermal comfort aspects of IEQ; the energy impacts and economics of such systems is well studied.  The most important remaining aspect of IEQ is Indoor Air Quality (IAQ).

Development of an Indoor Carbon Dioxide Metric

Indoor carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations have been used for decades to purportedly evaluate indoor air quality (IAQ) and ventilation. However, many applications of CO2 as a metric have reflected a lack of understanding of the connection between indoor CO2 levels, ventilation and IAQ. In many cases, an indoor concentration of 1800 mg/m3 (1000 ppmv) has been used as a metric of IAQ and ventilation without understanding its basis or significance.

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