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AIVC 2019 Conference, 15 -16 October 2019, Ghent

Registration is now open for the 40th AIVC conference: “From Energy crisis to sustainable indoor climate – 40 years of AIVC" to be held on October 15-16, 2019 in Ghent, Belgium together with the 8th TightVent and the 6th venticool conferences.

 

Confirmed topical sessions include:

English

Ductwork Airtightness Webinar – Recordings & slides now available!

The recordings and the slides of our recent webinar: “Ductwork airtightness measurements: protocols” held on 25 April 2019 and organised in cooperation with TightVent Europe and the Air Infiltration and Ventilation Centre, are now available online here

 

English

AIVC 2018 Conference Proceedings now available!

The Proceedings of the 39th AIVC - 7th TightVent & 5th venticool Conference "Smart Ventilation for Buildings", held in Antibes Juan-Les-Pins, France on 18-19 September, 2018 are now available for download.

Please click HERE to access the event's papers, slides and Book of Proceedings.

English

Smart Ventilation for Buildings (Book of Proceedings)

 

The Proceedings of the 39th AIVC Conference "Smart Ventilation for Buildings", held in Antibes Juan-Les-Pins, France, on 18-19 September 2018.

Ventilation Planning for Mid-sized Japanese Commercial Kitchens and Calculation Method of Ventilation Rate Using Building Information Modeling

In the design of a commercial kitchen ventilation system, it is very important to maintain the capture efficiency of exhaust hoods and ensure smooth removal of heat, moisture, and odor. The capture efficiency is affected by the kitchen ventilation system and the cooking appliance usage condition. To identify an appropriate ventilation system design method for commercial kitchens in Japan, surveys were conducted as follows. 

BIM-integrated Design tool for in-line recommended ventilation rates with Demand Controlled Ventilation strategy

Use of Demand Controlled ventilation (DCV) can potentially save more than 50% of energy use for ventilation purposes compared to constant air volume (CAV) ventilation. Correct and updated calculation of preset minimum (Vmin) and maximum (Vmax) airflow rates are important to maximize energy saving and to ensure good indoor quality. Furthermore, earlier studies have shown that controlling units' ability to actually handle V min is lacking and causes instability in the DCV systems 

Overview of what the EU is doing in relation to BIM

The European Commission’s Executive Agency for Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (EASME)  manages parts of the Horizon 2020 framework programme for research, innovation and market uptake (2014-2020), including for energy efficiency in the buildings sector. The Agency supports projects under this programme and ensures that their results are fed to policymaking teams within the European Commission.  

Estimated distributions of PM2.5 concentrations in the kitchens of the English housing stock for infiltration and mechanical ventilation scenarios

Exposures to elevated concentrations of airborne fine particulate matter with diameter ≤ 2.5 µm (PM2.5) have been linked to multiple negative health effects. Investigations into PM2.5 exposures primarily focus on external concentrations, which are easier to monitor. However, there is a growing interest in indoor exposures, as people spend up to 70% of their time at home, concentrations in dwellings may have a greater influence on personal exposures.

Assessment of Range Hoods based on Exposure

Cooking can be a major source of exposure to particulate matter. Range hoods can be used to reduce odours, moisture and contaminants resulting from cooking. The capture efficiency with regard to these contaminants is determined by the thermal plume and the aerodynamic properties of the range hood. There is a new ASTM (an international standards organization) test method: ASTM E3087. It measures capture efficiency under specific conditions that permits standardized comparison of range hoods under controlled laboratory conditions.

Measured Pollutant Performance of Island Overhead Kitchen Exhaust

Cooking is one of the most substantial sources of indoor air pollution in most residences.  This is mitigated most often by exhaust devices located near cooking surfaces.  In this study, we measured the efficacy of one type of kitchen ventilation device: an island overhead kitchen exhaust.  Laboratory tests using tracer gas capture were performed on a full-scale mock-up of a kitchen with a cooktop in an island. The results show that the Capture Efficiency (CE) varies greatly from about 10% to nearly 100%.

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