AIVC - Air Infiltration and Ventilation Centre

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Optimization of indoor air quality through controlled cross ventilation in the retrofitting of residential buildings

As an alternative to adopting active architectural systems (mechanical systems) and taking advantage of the resources provided by nature, natural ventilation contributes interesting solutions to control the thermal balance and the air quality, and it is applicable in a variety of climate zones. Natural ventilation also solves some of the more common problems of mechanical systems, such as the noise factor and installation and maintenance costs.

Influence of moving objects on ventilation plan for smoking room

Ventilation plan for smoking room must deal with pollutants since they affect the air quality of adjacent rooms. Although ventilation plan typically maintains a negative room pressure to remedy this problem, the transport of indoor air pollutants between rooms is affected by moving objects, such as human movement and door opening. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the effects of moving objects on the rate of transport of indoor air pollutants and to propose a method of controlling contamination for smoking room.

Is ventilation necessary and sufficient for acceptable indoor air quality?

The role of ventilation in achieving acceptable indoor air quality is examined in the light of emerging challenges, alternative mitigation strategies and performance indices within the spatial and time matrix of the indoor environment. By considering the source of contaminants, their nature, transportation mechanism and participation in source-sink relationships, several studies have shown that it may not be feasible nor adequate to rely on ventilation alone to attain the desired level of exposure, especially with respect to airborne aerosolised droplets with infectious potential.

Performance Testing of a Residential Motorless Air Exchanger System

A heat recovery ventilator (HRV) is used to create a balanced ventilation system in residential buildings and as an energy-saving measure. HRVs bring in outside air which is tempered with outgoing stale air, with only the small energy penalty of the blower power to overcome the pressure drop in the HRV. HRVs have been used in cold climates and have often performed poorly due to frosting failure.

Airtight duct systems [a simple way of improving a building’s energy efficiency without increased investment]

Against the background of increased global demands for energy efficiency, property owners should raise the standards of ductwork systems for ventilation, heating and air conditioning. This would not only save energy, but also mean lower installation costs, shorter assembly times and better air quality thanks to less leakage. The importance of energy-efficient buildings will increase in the future, not only due to rising electricity prices, but also due to increased environmental awareness.

Infiltration and Ventilation in a Very Tight, High Performance Home

The Net Zero Energy Residential Test Facility (NZERTF) was constructed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to support the development and adoption of cost-effective net zero energy designs and technologies. Key design objectives included providing occupant health and comfort through adequate ventilation and reduced indoor contaminant sources.

Case Study on Ventilation for Improving the Hygrothermal Behaviour of Emergency Temporary Housing under Japanese Conditions

Emergency Temporary Housing units consisting of a light-gauge steel brace construction were built following the Great East Japan Earthquake of March 11, 2011 (see Appendix). About 30,000 of these units are still in service following a delay in rehabilitation and reconstruction. The heat bridge portion in this kind of construction causes surface condensation in rooms. In addition, condensation damage on the steel roof surface in the attic space is also relatively large.

Simulated Influence of Indoor Climate and Ventilation on Schoolwork Performance in Estonian Manor Schools

Indoor temperature and humidity conditions as well as CO2 and airborne mould concentrations were measured in four manor schools in the Estonian cold climate. Based on these measurements, the influence of the indoor climate on the performance of schoolwork was assessed. The indoor environmental quality in manor schools turned out to be quite poor due to the inadequate performance of ventilation and heating systems. Intermittent stove heating was found to secure the minimum temperature in general but in winter thermal comfort was not always guaranteed.

Experimental and Modelling Investigations of Air Exchange and Infection Transfer due to Hinged-Door Motion in Office and Hospital Settings

Occupants spend a significant amount of time indoors where temperature and air quality has an important impact on their comfort, health and work performance. Understanding the role of airflow exchange between spaces is crucial to describe the processes of mixing and transport of substances driven by air motion and therefore essential for evaluating indoor air quality. This work presents the results of field measurements and laboratory experiments designed to characterise door operation and to quantify its influence on air volumes exchanged between rooms due to door motion.

Air Tightness of Ventilation Ductwork in Recently Built Low-Energy and Conventional Houses

The air tightness of ventilation ductwork was measured in two recently built low-energy houses and in two conventionally built houses in the summer of 2013. The ducts and components were metal in three houses and plastic in one house. The air tightness of the ductwork had been checked by an installation survey after construction. The measured leakage airflows corresponded to air tightness class A or lower, therefore did not satisfy the minimum requirement set for class B regarding the air tightness of ventilation ductwork.

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