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Indoor Carbon Dioxide Concentrations in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality Standards

Indoor carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations have played a role in discussions of ventilation and indoor air quality (IAQ) since the 18th century. Those discussions have evolved over the years to focus on the impacts of CO2 concentrations on building occupants, how these concentrations relate to occupant perception of bioeffluents, the use of indoor CO2 concentrations to estimate ventilation rates, and CO2–based demand control ventilation. This paper reviews how indoor CO2 has been dealt with in ventilation and IAQ standards in the context of these issues.

Analysis of indoor air quality & thermal comfort parameters in building regulations in 8 member states

It is estimated that people spend 60-90% of their life in indoor environments. Therefore, it is obvious that indoor air quality (IAQ) and thermal comfort are of highly importance for the health and wellbeing of the population. Consequently, buildings should be designed to ensure proper indoor conditions. Furthermore, the need to mitigate climate change and to reduce energy import dependency, provides additional challenges for the design and operation of buildings and requires a dramatic reduction in their energy consumption and emissions.

Impact of the new rite 2013 (regulation on thermal installation) on indoor air quality

This paper presents a comparison of Indoor Air Quality in several buildings constructed prior to the implementation of the new Spanish regulation on thermal installations (RITE, 2007 modified on 2013) and some new ones that fully accomplish the requirements of this new regulation.

Mitigating Occupant Exposure to PM2.5s Emitted by Cooking in High Occupancy Dwellings Using Natural Ventilation Strategies

The long term exposure to fine particulate matter with a diameter of ≤2.5 μm (PM2.5) is linked to numerous health problems, including chronic respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. In dwellings, a primary emission source of PM2.5 is cooking, an activity conducted several times per day in most households. People spend over 90% of their time indoors and more time in their homes than any other type of building. Therefore, they are at risk of exposure to elevated levels of PM2.5 emitted by cooking if these particles are not removed at source.

The effect of CO2 on the nocturnal restlessness of an Alzheimer patient

At typical indoor CO2 levels there is no scientific evidence that CO2 is harmful to comfort and health of healthy persons, though there is a potential for negative effects on some aspects of performance. Research also indicates that insufficient bedroom ventilation may negatively affect the quality of sleep.

Assessment of spatial and temporal distribution of thermal comfort and IAQ in low energy houses

According to the International Energy Agency, buildings represent over one-third of total final energy consumption. Thus, a more sustainable future begins with low energy buildings which must combine comfort and function using passive systems and new evolving technologies. Policies to reduce building energy consumption and carbon emissions have been developed worldwide during the last decades.

IEA EBC Annex 68 – Subtask 4, Strategies for design and control of buildings

The objectives of Subtask 4 are to develop design and control strategies for energy efficient ventilation in residential buildings which ensure high indoor air quality. The strategies must go beyond the current common practice and actively utilize recent research findings regarding indoor air pollutants and combined heat, air and moisture transfer as well as benefit from recent advances in sensor technology and controls.

IEA EBC Annex 68 – Subtask 3, Modelling

The objectives of Subtask 3 Modeling are to improve the understanding and develop prediction models on the impacts of outdoor pollutants, thermal environment, building materials and envelope, and indoor furnishing and occupant activities on the indoor air quality, and the energy necessary to achieve the desired IAQ level in residential buildings, considering the IAQ metrics and pollution loads to be developed in Subtask 1 and 2, respectively.

IEA EBC Annex 68 – Subtask 2, Pollutant Loads in Buildings

First the Subtask will organize a literature survey and make researcher contacts to gather relevant data and existing knowledge on major pollutant sources and loads in buildings, including models. Laboratory testing and model setup to provide examples of new types of data which shall be beneficial to improve knowledge on combined effects that must be taken into consideration in order to achieve new paradigms for energy optimal operation of buildings.

IEA EBC Annex 68 – Subtask 1: Defining the metrics

Subtask 1 of IEA EBC Annex 68 will aim at defining the metrics to enable a proper consideration of both energy and IAQ benefit in building design and operation

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