AIVC - Air Infiltration and Ventilation Centre

Search form

EBC

You are here

Home

indoor air quality

Introduction: Why performance-based assessment methods? Overview of the needs and the possibilities

In future building regulations 2020, building performance is going to be extended to global performance, including indoor air quality (IAQ). In the energy performance (EP) field, successive regulations pushed for a "performance-based" approach, based on an energy consumption requirement at the design stage. Nevertheless, ventilation regulations throughout the world are still mostly based on prescriptive approaches, setting airflows requirements. A performance-based approach for ventilation would insure that ventilation is designed to avoid risks for occupant’s health. 

Performance-based assessment methods for ventilation systems: Overview of on-going work in France and in Europe

In the field of energy performance, successive regulations pushed a "performance-based" approach, based at least on an energy consumption requirement at the design stage for heating and/or cooling systems (Spekkink 2005). Nevertheless, in the field of building ventilation, regulations throughout the world are mainly still based on “prescriptive” approaches, using airflows or air change rates requirements.  

HVAC and VOCs: interaction between building systems and indoor VOC concentrations

HVAC systems in newly built or extensively renovated dwellings were all developed with the aim for energy saving with equal or better comfort. However, these systems (floor heating and DCV systems) have certain characteristics which increase the emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and give VOCs the chance to accumulate to higher concentrations. This interaction is investigated based on dynamic simulations using a temperature and humidity dependent VOC emission model. 

Practical use of the Annex68 IAQ Dashboard

The present paper aims at illustrating the practical use of the Annex68 IAQ Dashboard. To this end, numerical simulations have been performed to provide useable data about the Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) of a low-energy detached house. The dashboard has been used to compare three possible solutions of ventilation systems commonly found in French residential buildings i.e. natural ventilation using vertical ducts for extraction, self-regulated exhaust and balanced mechanical ventilation.

40 Years of Modeling Airflows

The modelling of air flows to investigate indoor air quality and energy issues has been a topic at the AIVC for all of its 40 years. Models have been developed that range in complexity from single-zone algebraic expressions that can be calculated by hand to complex multi-zone approaches that integrate contaminant transport and other functions.

The Role of Carbon Dioxide in Ventilation and IAQ Evaluation: 40 years of AIVC

The purpose of this summary is to review Air Infiltration and Ventilation Centre activities, as reflected in its publications, related to indoor carbon dioxide over the 40 years that have transpired since its creation. These activities, like most applications of indoor CO2 to the fields of ventilation and indoor air quality, have focused on the following: control of outdoor ventilation rates, i.e., demand control ventilation; use as a tracer gas to measure outdoor air change rates; providing an indicator or metric of IAQ; and, directly impacting human health, comfort and performance.

Energy and Indoor Air Quality Analysis of Mixed Air and Displacement Ventilation Systems

Indoor pollutants and particles pose a threat to human health as people spend 90% of their time in indoor spaces. A proper ventilation system should be able to remove indoor air pollutants, reduce particle depositions, at the lowest energy consumption by that system. In this work, particle concentrations and depositions are presented for two ventilation configurations (1) Displacement Ventilation (DV) and (2) the conventional ceiling supply and return.

A large-scale longitudinal indoor air quality study: is low-cost sensor deployment a viable approach?

To date, the vast majority of indoor air quality studies have relied on repeated visits to dwellings to obtain data derived from short-term monitoring exercises, a time-consuming process that places considerable constraints on personnel, equipment and costs. These studies have focussed on the use of research-grade instrumentation; however, recent developments in the field of consumer-grade indoor air quality sensor technology offers new opportunities.

Developing a new passive tracer gas test for air change rate measurement

Ventilation is critical in interpreting indoor air quality (IAQ), yet few IAQ assessments report ventilation rates; even when they do, the measurement method is often not fully described. Most ventilation assessments use a tracer gas test (TGT) to measure total air change rate. In a TGT, the indoor air is marked with an easily identifiable gas (tracer) and the air change rate (ACH) is inferred by monitoring the tracer’s injection rate and concentration.

Airtightness and non-uniformity of ventilation rates in a naturally ventilated building with trickle vents

Infiltration is an uncontrolled contribution to ventilation in a building and can contribute significantly to the total ventilation rate, particularly in older, leaky, dwellings which can rely on infiltration to provide adequate indoor air quality. However, as explored in this paper, using a whole house airtightness metric to characterise ventilation rates can fail to identify low ventilation rates in specific rooms. 

Pages