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Lessons learned from a ten-year monitoring in residential buildings equipped with humidity based demand controlled ventilation in France

Humidity-based DCV systems have been widely used in France for 35 years and are considered as a reference system, including for low-energy residential buildings. Indeed, most of the new residential buildings, which must be low-energy buildings to comply with the RT 2012 energy performance regulation, are equipped with such systems. Feedbacks from two long-term studies show the durability of the humidity sensitive components and show the robustness of this system to bad maintenance or use by occupants.

Issues on humidity environment and health problem

Japan is characterized by high humidity in summer and low humidity in winter. Therefore, summer is in a climatic condition where mold is easy to grow, and in fact, mold damage is occurring. Due to improvement of the thermal insulation and airtightness of houses, the temperature in the room is maintained high even in winter, and mold damage occurs. We will introduce the research we have conducted regarding humidity environment and health problems, and discuss future subjects. The outline is as follows. 

Big humidity data from smart ventilation systems

A smart ventilation system is generally equipped with a range of sensors. The data – or data derived from it - collected by these sensors can be used by both building owners, occupants and managers. A new generation of IoT  enabled residential ventilation systems allows collecting and analysing this data at scale to get a better view on typical IAQ conditions in dwellings. In this paper, the results from such an analysis on the first 900 installed devices of a new model with respect to moisture in relatively new Belgian dwellings is presented. 

Analysis of the Effects of Ventilation Method on Indoor Humidity Distribution and Condensation by CFD method

People spend 70% -90% of their time indoors. Indoor air quality and human body’s health have a close relationship. With the advance of society, user comfort requirements for thermal environment are rising. Humidity is an important parameter for evaluating indoor air quality, which not only affects the thermal comfort of the human body but also seriously restricts the function of the building. In winter, the indoor humidity is dry. When using humidifier, the humidity around the humidifier is higher, but there is still a dry area in the room.

Impact of construction stages on Indoor Air Quality

Since the turn of the century, alarming data produced by the Indoor Air Quality Observatory (OQAI) have led to changes in French legislation, including, most notably, the introduction of compulsory labelling for construction products (decree no. 2011-321 of 23 March 2011).

Feedback on installation, maintenance, and aging of mechanical humidity-controlled ventilation exhaust units

With 35 years of existence and more than 10 million equipped dwellings, mechanical humidity-based demand-controlled ventilation (RH-DCV) can provide a comprehensive feedback on installation, aging, and maintenance of its components. Their working principle is based on the extensions and retractions of a hygroscopic fabric, which pulls on a shutter to modify the device’s cross-section – hence the airflow – upon humidity changes in their environment. 

Investigation of future ventilation flow rate requirements for dwellings in Belgium: from the application of FprEN16798-1:2016 to proposed robust rules

In the context of the PREVENT project, preparing a possible revision of the Belgian residential ventilation standard, the way of expressing ventilation requirements, among others in terms of ventilation flow rates, needs to be investigated. The aim of this paper is to propose and compare ways of expression of the ventilation requirements in terms of flow rates with respect to their robustness across dwellings.

Development of a Seasonal Smart Ventilation Controller to Reduce Indoor Humidity in Hot-Humid Climate Homes

Controlling indoor humidity is important in homes, because high indoor humidity is associated with occupant health and building durability issues. Ventilation is often used to avoid peaks of moisture in homes, such as in kitchens and bathrooms. However, in hot-humid climates, outdoor air can have higher humidity than indoors, and continuous whole house ventilation can lead to increases in indoor humidity levels.

What is the relationship between humidity and comfort at high temperatures? In search of new ways of looking at the issue

This draft paper was developed as a stalking horse for the Windsor 2014 Conference workshop on Statistics, It presents the results of summer time field work undertaken by Abdulrahman Alsheikh in the region of Damman, Saudi Arabia and the data collected shows that middle class homes families there occasionally report thermal neutrality at very high temperatures and humidities.

Short-term prediction of weather parameters using online weather forecasts

While people need to know tomorrow’s weather to decide suitable activities and precautions, so do the “intelligent” building management systems. The accuracy of the short-term prediction of the ambient conditions is particularly import for the development  of predictive control strategies.

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