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Smart Ventilation for Buildings (Book of Proceedings)

 

The Proceedings of the 39th AIVC Conference "Smart Ventilation for Buildings", held in Antibes Juan-Les-Pins, France, on 18-19 September 2018.

Smart Ventilation for Buildings (Slides)

The Presentations at the 39th AIVC Conference "Smart Ventilation for Buildings", held in Antibes Juan-Les-Pins, France, on 18-19 September 2018.

Indoor air quality investigation in a ventilated demonstrator building via a smart sensor

This study deals with ventilation effects on measured and perceived indoor air quality (IAQ) in a demonstrator building where IAQ problems can occur. Unlike outdoor air, indoor air is usually recycled continuously, which makes it trapping pollutants. Indoor air quality (IAQ) is characterized by a pollutants' concentration, as well as air temperature and humidity. The study's aim is to implement an efficient and smart ventilation system while leaning on continuous measurements of indoor air pollutants in a demonstrator building via a smart sensor based on a Raspberry Pi 3 model B+ card.

Economics of Indoor Air Quality

Buildings represent a major end use of energy throughout the world and are typically the dominant sector for electricity.   The use of that energy is to provide buildings services, the most important of which is Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ).  Heating and air conditioning systems typically handle the thermal comfort aspects of IEQ; the energy impacts and economics of such systems is well studied.  The most important remaining aspect of IEQ is Indoor Air Quality (IAQ).

Control of Distributed Cooling and Ventilation Systems in Hot and Humid Climates

In the research project 3for2 Beyond Efficiency, low-exergy distributed cooling and ventilation systems for application in the tropics are designed and tested in a demonstrator building in Singapore. The HVAC system designed consists of passive chilled beams for sensible cooling, fan coil units for latent cooling and dedicated outdoor air handling systems for IAQ control. The design reduces building space requirements due to less ventilation equipment.

What is smart ventilation? Presentation of the AIVC definition

In 2017, the Air Infiltration and Ventilation Centre (AIVC) identified smart ventilation for buildings as a new and important topic to be addressed. One of the tasks was to agree on a definition of smart ventilation, which was published in March 2018. The purpose of this presentation is to explain and illustrate the smart ventilation definition by AIVC.

VIP 39: A review of performance-based approaches to residential smart ventilation

Ventilation Information Paper no39: “A review of performance-based approaches to residential smart ventilation” provides an overview of the regulations and standards proposing “performance-based approaches” in five countries to promote the use of smart ventilation strategies. It shows that a favorable context exists in many countries for the development of smart ventilation strategies.

VIP 38: What is smart ventilation?

In March 2017, AIVC identified smart ventilation for buildings as a new and important topic to be addressed.

Several actions were defined by AIVC Board about this topic in order to exchange and disseminate information on this topic. A working group of AIVC experts from several countries was created. One of its tasks was to agree on a definition of smart ventilation.

The purpose of this ventilation information paper is to present and illustrate this definition of "smart ventilation".

IAQ sensors for smart ventilation of buildings

6 March, 2018 | IAQ sensors for smart ventilation of buildings

AIVC defines smart ventilation as a process to continually adjust the ventilation system of a building in order to provide the desired Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) benefits while minimizing energy consumption, utility bills and other non-IAQ costs (thermal discomfort, noise, etc.). Smart ventilation responds to one or more of the following: building occupancy, outdoor conditions, electricity grid needs, operation of other building systems, direct sensing of contaminants.

Development of a Seasonal Smart Ventilation Controller to Reduce Indoor Humidity in Hot-Humid Climate Homes

Controlling indoor humidity is important in homes, because high indoor humidity is associated with occupant health and building durability issues. Ventilation is often used to avoid peaks of moisture in homes, such as in kitchens and bathrooms. However, in hot-humid climates, outdoor air can have higher humidity than indoors, and continuous whole house ventilation can lead to increases in indoor humidity levels.