Evaluation of indoor pressure distributions in a detached house using the Pulse airtightness measurement technique

Building airtightness is a critical aspect for energy-efficient buildings as energy performance of a building can be reduced significantly by poor airtightness. The Pulse technique has been regarded as a promising technology, which measures the building airtightness at a low pressure of 4Pa by rapidly releasing a 1.5-second pulse of air from a pressurised vessel into the test building and thereby creating an instant pressure rise that quickly reaches a “quasi-steady” condition. However, questions have often been asked on the test viability due to the nature of the test.

Insights into the impact of wind on the Pulse airtightness test in a UK dwelling

Requirements for measuring the building airtightness have been proposed and included by many countries for national regulations or energy-efficient programs to address the negative effect of poor airtightness on building energy performance, durability and indoor environment. The methods for measuring building airtightness have continuously improved and evolved over a number of years.

Designing a model-scale experiment to evaluate the impact of steady wind on building air leakage measurements

Since the 1970s, many authors have discussed the impact of poor airtightness on building energy use, indoor air quality, building damage, or noise transmission. Nowadays, because poor airtightness affects significantly the energy performance of buildings, and even more significantly with low-energy targets, many countries include requirements for building airtightness in their national regulations or energy-efficiency programs. Building pressurization tests are increasingly used for compliance checks to energy performance requirements and may result in severe penalties.

Wind speed in building airtightness test protocols: a review

Since the 1970s, many authors have discussed the impact of poor airtightness on building energy use, indoor air quality, building damage, or noise transmission (Carrié and Rosenthal, 2008) (Tamura, 1975) (Sherman and Chan, 2006) (Orr and Figley, 1980). Nowadays, because poor airtightness affects significantly the energy performance of buildings, and even more significantly with low-energy targets, many countries include requirements for building airtightness in their national regulations or energy-efficiency programs.

French database of building airtightness, statistical analyses of about 215,000 measurements: impacts of buildings characteristics and seasonal variations

The French database of building airtightness has been fed by measurement performed by qualified testers since 2006. In 2015 and 2016, the database was enriched by 63,409 and 65,958 measurements respectively, which is 74% more than in 2014, making the total number of measurements about 215,000. However, residential buildings (multi-family and single dwellings) account for almost all of measurements, only 4% of tests are performed in non-residential buildings. Indeed, since 2013 the French EP-regulation requires a limit for airtightness level for all new dwellings.

A comparison study of the blower door and novel pulse technique on measuring enclosure airtightness in a controlled environment

This paper introduces a comparison study of measuring the airtightness of a house sized test chamber using the novel pulse technique and the standard blower door method in a controlled environment. Eight different testing plates have been applied to the improvised envelope of the chamber to establish different leakage characteristics. Each testing plate has a unique opening in the centre of the plate, achieved by obtaining a different combination of shape and thickness of the opening.

VIP 37: Impact of Energy Policies on Building and Ductwork Airtightness

This Ventilation Information Paper analyses both the policy instruments used (regulatory requirements and incentives, specific programme requirements, quality frameworks for testers and builders) and the changes observed in practice in terms of building and ductwork airtightness over the past 5 years, using as reference mostly publications from AIVC and TightVent led events. Although we have not restricted our literature review to specific parts of the world, the majority of the publications we found come from Europe and the USA.

Building airtightness in Germany -what are the driving forces

Building airtightness in Germany is on a good way. The latest survey amongst FLiB members shows the n50-values are much better than the benchmarks given in EnEV 2014 (German EPBD). For airtightness tests in 2014 the average n50-value of single-family houses is 1.1 ACH for new buildings and 1.6 ACH for refurbishments. In multi-family houses the average n50-value for new buildings is 0.9 ACH and 1.5 ACH for refurbishments.

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