19 January 2021, Webinar – Building airtightness improvements of the building stock- Analysis of European databases

Air infiltration in buildings has multiple consequences on energy use and indoor environmental quality. Therefore, in the last 10 years many countries have introduced requirements for building airtightness in their EP-regulation. Those requirements often prescribe that a test is performed by a qualified tester and that every test performed is recorded in a database.  Hundreds of thousands of data are now available in Europe.

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AIVC 2022 Conference, Rotterdam – 5-6 October, 2022

We are pleased to announce that the AIVC 2022 Conference “Ventilation Challenges in a changing world" is now accepting abstracts & proposals for topical sessions. The Conference will be held on October 5-6, 2022, at the Hilton Hotel, in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. It will be a joint event combined with the 10th TightVent and the 8th venticool conferences.

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5-6 October 2022, Conference, Rotterdam – 42nd AIVC conference

The 42nd AIVC conference: "Ventilation Challenges in a Changing World" will be held in the city of Rotterdam, the Netherlands together with the 10th TightVent and the 8th venticool conferences on October 5-6, 2022.

Conference Scope

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The natural pressure differential – Wind infiltration. Results from a long-term measurement

Purpose of the work

The pressure differential at the building envelope results from wind pressure and thermal lift. European and German standards include in the calculation of corresponding infiltration the parameters wind speed, temperature differential, and the wind pressure coefficient from building inflow and outflow. This long-term measurement is to compare the calculations to the pressure differentials measured.

Method of approach

The status quo of airtight building in Germany

Purpose of the work

What is the status quo of airtight building in Germany? Are we well on our way or still far from the target? What about measuring practice in Germany? Should we concentrate on the documentation of measurement results or is it more important to exert a positive influence on the building process overall? Which requirements and targets are set by the legislators, which by the development banks?

Method of approach

Overview, compilation and review of publications.

Content of the contribution

Decentralized ventilation system versus (the lack of) building airtightness

Purpose of the work

By way of practical examples, the presentation shows that decentralized ventilation systems do neither make airtightness measurements more difficult nor distort them, and despite the requirements for a high level of airtightness for buildings also ensure good indoor air quality.

Method of approach

The airtight cistern – A blessing or a curse?

Purpose of the work

Over the past years, the industry has launched a great number of products facilitating the airtight installation of sanitary fixtures in the airtight building envelope. However, the pre-wall mounting racks of cisterns remain a “key point” for assessing the airtightness of pre-walls.

Method of approach

As part of the rehabilitation of an indoor swimming pool, “airtight” pre-wall mounting racks were developed and used. This was due to the flush buttons causing “seepage” of the compound seal.

Impact of energy policies on building and ductwork airtightness

Purpose of the work

This paper aims at reviewing and analysing changes and developments in various countries on building and ductwork airtightness in the past 5 years.

Method of approach

Airtightness design as required by the KfW

Purpose of the work

The German Industrial Standard DIN 4108-7 has been the standard to stipulate the requirements as well as recommendations for planning and implementing airtight construction for a long time (since 2001). However, the principles of airtight building have not yet been well established in general building practice.

From “16 to 1“ ‒ Retrofitting airtightness of roofs in existing buildings from the inside

Purpose of the work

Many top-floor apartments and single-family homes from the ’80s and ’90s had been insulated in the roof area using aluminum-clad panels or PE foils and had frequently been covered with profiled wood. These buildings suffer from a significant lack of airtightness that can be retrofitted from the inside with a high technical quality. The improvement in airtightness achieved by this approach in most cases shows better results than a retrofit from the outside.

Method of approach

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