Radon detection with a BlowerDoor – a report from experience

Purpose of the work

To expand the use of BlowerDoor and thermal equipment combined with Radon

Method of approach

When building is set on very low negative pressure, use the Radon sniff-equipment called RAD7 to count radon at places where thermal imaging camera tell there is draft that can be assumed tob e leaks from the ground. If the found leakages are from the ground it often show higher level of Thoron, Radon and Polonium values, than the measurements elsewhere in the room.

Conclusions

New findings on measurements of very airtight buildings and apartments

The trend in European countries, such as Belgium, France and Germany is that the quality of the airtightness of the building envelope is getting better and better. This is true for small, airtight apartments, Passive houses and some large buildings with an excellent airtightness due to special requirements, e.g. oxygen reduction or fire protection.

Durability and measurement uncertainty of airtightness in extremely airtight dwellings

In this paper we present a series of leakage tests on extremely airtight dwellings (ACH50 < 0.6 upon completion) in which the durability of the airtightness and the measurement uncertainty involved are assessed. In literature, repeatability and reproducibility issues have been discussed by several authors, along with influences of weather. It remains unclear, however, to what extent the available uncertainty intervals are relative or absolute.

The power of quality

Through the experiences gained by building a sufficient number of air-tight buildings, the author will illustrate the ease of detailing and constructing an air tight building. Using parallels to conventional building typologies, the methods of making an air-tight building enveloppe will be explained. The presentation will be divided into following chapters:

1. Precicious building methodology. 

Air Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report

Most dwellings in the United States are ventilated primarily through leaks in the building shell (i.e., infiltration) rather than by whole-house mechanical ventilation systems. Consequently, quantification of envelope air-tightness is critical to determining how much energy is being lost through infiltration and how much infiltration is contributing toward ventilation requirements. Envelope air tightness and air leakage can be determined from fan pressurization measurements with a blower door. Tens of thousands of unique fan pressurization measurements have been made of U.S.