Recommendations and challenges for CEN and ISO standards

          

Better implementation of ventilative cooling (cooling of buildings using outside air as main source) in national building standards, legislation and compliance tools

Low energy buildings are highly insulated and airtight and therefore subject to overheating risks, where Ventilative cooling (VC) might be a relevant solution. VC is an application (distribution in time and space) of air flow rates to reduce cooling loads in spaces using outside air driven by natural, mechanical or hybrid ventilation strategies. Ventilative cooling reduces overheating in both existing and new buildings - being both a sustainable and energy efficient solution to improve indoor thermal comfort (State-of-the-art-review, Kolokotroni et al., 2015).

Background and Objective of IEA-EBC Annex 78. Supplementing Ventilation with Gas-phase Air Cleaning, Implementation and Energy Implications

The proposed Annex should bring researchers and industry together to investigate the possible energy benefits by using gas phase air cleaners (partial substitute for ventilation) and establish procedures for improving indoor air quality or reduced amount of ventilation by gas phase air cleaning. The project shall also establish a test method for air cleaners that considers the influence on the perceived air quality and substances in the indoor air.

Rationale behind ventilation standards and regulations given by 20 countries

International there are many different requirements and regulations for ventilation.  Sometimes the variation is more than a factor of five. There are strong drivers to reduce energy consumption for HVAC, and therefore the spread in requirements and regulation is worthwhile to study. To reduce ventilation flows there is a necessity to understand the reasons behind. Demand control to reduce this flows is in many countries growing but the control parameters are quite different, for instance humidity versus CO2 control.

Status and recommendations for better implementation of ventilative cooling into Danish standards, building legislation and energy compliance tool

Ventilative cooling (VC) is an application (distribution in time and space) of air flow rates to reduce cooling loads in spaces using outside air driven by natural, mechanical or hybrid ventilation strategies. Ventilative cooling reduces overheating in both existing and new buildings - being both a sustainable and energy efficient solution to improve indoor thermal comfort. In new buildings VC, may save cooling energy and thereby make it easier to fulfil future energy legislation for buildings.

Shifting the IEQ Paradigm from Comfort Silos to Holistic Health and Performance

Indoor environmental quality (IEQ) is generally taken to encompass four main factors: indoor air quality (IAQ), thermal conditions, visual quality, and acoustical quality. Although there is an implicit concern for safety, the predominant metrics all four in standards for design of buildings are based on perceived quality or comfort.

Indoor Carbon Dioxide Concentrations in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality Standards

Indoor carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations have played a role in discussions of ventilation and indoor air quality (IAQ) since the 18th century. Those discussions have evolved over the years to focus on the impacts of CO2 concentrations on building occupants, how these concentrations relate to occupant perception of bioeffluents, the use of indoor CO2 concentrations to estimate ventilation rates, and CO2–based demand control ventilation. This paper reviews how indoor CO2 has been dealt with in ventilation and IAQ standards in the context of these issues.

Experiences with ventilative cooling in practical application based on experiences with completed active houses

The present paper addresses experiences with ventilation and thermal comfort in the Active House concept, based on the Active House Specification and realized Active Houses. The Active House Specification is based on a holistic view on buildings including Comfort, Energy and Environment. It uses functional requirements to indoor air quality and thermal comfort. Experiences from realised Active House projects show that better airtightness than nationally required has been achieved.

Pages