TN 68: Residential Ventilation and Health

Exposures in homes constitute the major part of exposures to airborne pollutants experienced through the human lifetime. They can constitute from 60 to 95% of our total lifetime exposures, of which 30% occurs when we sleep.

Potential of mechanical ventilation for reducing overheating risks in retrofitted Danish apartment buildings from the period 1850-1890 – A simulation-based study

Advancing energy efficient renovation solutions in buildings necessitate adopting high-insulation and airtightness to avoid heat loss through transmission and infiltration, which can result in overheating. Elevated indoor temperatures have a highly negative effect on building occupants’ health, wellbeing and productivity. With the possibility of remote working, people spend more time at home, and therefore addressing the elevated indoor temperatures and the overheating risks in residential buildings proves to be essential.

Energy analysis for balanced ventilation units from field studies

Balanced ventilation units are well known to provide a sufficient amount of fresh air in residential buildings in a controlled way, without relying on ever-changing naturally driven forces. During colder periods, heat recovery ensures a reduction of the ventilation heating load. Outside the colder periods, recovery is reduced or shut off automatically, providing mechanical ventilative cooling. During warmer periods, the recovery is used again to provide a comfortably cool supply of fresh air.

Technologies to overcome effects of condensation in exchangers of ventilation units - analysis of monitored field studies

Balanced ventilation with heat recovery is an efficient way to maintain low heating demand for ventilation in residential buildings. Laboratory measurements of today’s heat recovery ventilation units show high temperature recovery efficiency during standard conditions. In practice, however, the recovery efficiency may decrease due to circumstances that deviate from the standard laboratory conditions.

Investigation of future ventilation flow rate requirements for dwellings in Belgium: from the application of FprEN16798-1:2016 to proposed robust rules

In the context of the PREVENT project, preparing a possible revision of the Belgian residential ventilation standard, the way of expressing ventilation requirements, among others in terms of ventilation flow rates, needs to be investigated. The aim of this paper is to propose and compare ways of expression of the ventilation requirements in terms of flow rates with respect to their robustness across dwellings.

Design and operation of ventilation in low energy residences – A survey on code requirements and building reality from six European countries and China

One of the key objectives of the IEA Annex 68 research programme entitled “Indoor Air Quality Design and Control in Low Energy Residential Buildings” is to provide a generic guideline for the design and operation of ventilation in residential buildings. They need to have minimal energy consumption, and at the same time maintain a high level of Indoor Air Quality (IAQ). The paper reports on preliminary results of an interview survey conducted among different stakeholders involved in design, installation and operation of residential ventilation in countries involved in the Annex.

Primary energy used in centralized and decentralized ventilation systems measured in field tests in residential buildings

Ventilation systems can save heat energy by using heat recovery, but consume electrical energy to power the fans. In practice, the energy efficiency of those systems can be lower than expected, when compared to the nominal values provided by the manufacturer. In this paper, results of a comprehensive field tests with 20 centralized and 60 decentralized ventilation systems for residential buildings and the calculation of the primary energy savings of those devices are presented.

Summer performance of residential heat recovery ventilation with an air-to-air heat pump cooling system

Increasing airtightness and isolation of residential buildings in today’s climates cause challenging situations for the summer indoor climate. In combination with ventilation for fresh air, it calls for intelligent control of passive cooling when available, and active cooling when needed.

The combination of heat recovery ventilation and an air-to-air heat pump cooling system is a solution to these challenging situations. With the exhaust air heat pump cooling system, heat is transferred from the supply air (which is getting colder) to the exhaust air (which is getting warmer).

The effect of enthalpy recovery ventilation on the residential indoor climate

The indoor climate in residential buildings is affected by the people that live in the house and their activities. One of the goals of a ventilation system is to prevent excess humidity in the house by removing part of the moisture. The moisture balance can however be distorted in winter with a low humidity in the house as a result.

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