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Solutions to a mixed boundary problem for soil gas flow.

The principal soil gases of current concern to building are radon and landfill gas. The flow of these is generally thought to be dominated by viscous flow under a pressure gradient. This paper presents results for such pressure-driven flow of gas for problems relating to a building with a bare soil floor, for example below a suspended timber floor. The solutions address this problem in two dimensions as a mixed boundary problem.

Conformal mapping of a solution to a mixed boundary problem for soil gas flow.

The principal soil gases of current concern to building are radon and landfill gas. The flow of these is generally considered to be dominated by viscous flow driven by pressure differences. This paper presents results for the pressure-driven flow of gas for problems relating to a building with a bare soil floor, for example below a suspended timber floor. This paper builds on a previous paper by mapping the solution to a mixed boundary problem onto another geometry. In a third paper these results will be compared with an analytical result from elsewhere and an experiment.

Development of a demand control strategy in buildings using radon and carbon dioxide levels.

Air change rates, indoor radon and carbon dioxide levels were monitored in a lecture theatre in the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Two preliminary measurements (Cases 1 and 2) and one series of demand control ventilation simulation (Case 3) were made to investigate the indoor air quality of the lecture theatre. Radon and carbon dioxide levels were found to be relatively high in Case 1 and later improved at the expense of operating the system catering for maximum occupancy in Case 2.

Influence of thermal comfort and building materials on indoor radon air concentration in some regions from Transylvania (Romania).

The purpose of this work is to see the influence of the heat preservation in the cold season and also to show the building material influence on the indoor radon concentration in dwellings. Three methods were used to measure the radon content in houses and buildings (workplaces). The results of measurements show that in the winter season the indoor radon concentration is about 2 times higher than in the summer season for these regions from Transylvania.

Radon sump systems.

            

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