Refined assessment and comparison of airtightness measurement of indoor chambers using the blower door and Pulse methods

Previous studies have compared the airtightness measurement of test enclosures utilising both the novel Pulse technique and the conventional blower door method.  Discrepancies between results of the two test methods were observed and it was concluded that differences either caused by wind or blower door installation integrity would have had an impact upon the results.

Comparison between infiltration rate predictions using the divide-by-20 rule of thumb and real measurements

Across different territories there are various normative models for assessing energy demand of domestic dwellings, which use simplified approaches to account for the heat loss due to the air infiltration of a building.  For instance, the United Kingdom uses a dwelling energy model, known as the Standard Assessment Procedure (SAP), and this utilises a process where the measured air permeability value (q50), is simply divided by 20 to provide an infiltration rate (subsequent modification factors are then used for factors such as sheltering etc.).

Experimental study on the measurement of Building Infiltration and Air Leakage rates (at 4 and 50 Pa) by means of Tracer Gas methods, Blower Door and the novel Pulse technique in a Detached UK Home

Air infiltration contributes to a heat loss typically representing up to one third of the heating demand of a building. The building airtightness, also quantified as air leakage, is the fundamental building property that impacts infiltration. The steady (de)pressurization method (blower door) is the widely accepted standard process for measuring building air leakage. However, this method requires the enclosure to be pressurised to a typical range of 10-60 Pa, which is not physically representative of the pressures experienced by buildings under natural conditions.

Experimental Investigation of the Impact of Environmental Conditions on the Measurement of Building Infiltration, and its correlation with Airtightness

The air infiltration of a building, which fundamentally depends on its airtightness, can be a significant contributor to its heat loss.  It can also be affected by other factors such as external terrain, leakage distribution, sheltering factor and environmental conditions. The infiltration rate of a detached UK house was monitored for 2 months in early 2018 using constant concentration and decay tracer gas methods under various temperature and wind conditions.