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Ambient air filter efficiency in airtight, highly energy efficient dwellings – A simulation study to evaluate benefits and associated energy costs

Highly energy efficient buildings such as ones built to the Passive House standard, require a very airtight building envelope and the installation of a mechanical ventilation with heat recovery (MVHR). MVHR systems incorporate ambient air filters, which reduce the introduction of particulate matter (PM) from outdoor sources into the dwelling. However, indoor PM sources, e.g. cooking, can also contribute substantially to occupants’ exposure and need to be accounted for when designing ventilation or deriving recommendations for filter classes. 

Out2In: impact of filtration and air purification on the penetration of outdoor air pollutants into the indoor environment by ventilation

Within the ventilation principle of buildings, the outdoor air is considered as a source of fresh, "clean" air. Outdoor air quality monitoring by environmental agencies, academic research projects and a broad range of citizen science projects show that this is not always the case. Although the outdoor air quality in our cities already improved, the concentrations of certain pollutants, especially particulate matter and peak pollutions of ozone (and its precursors nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds), remain problematic.

The Assessment of Particulate Matter (PM2.5) Removal Efficiency on Air Cleaner Products through Full Scale Test in Korea

This study is designed to investigate the particulate matter removal efficiency of domestic air cleaner products and seeks to compare the particulate matter removal efficiency in a laboratory with that in real life. 

New release! AIVC Contributed Report 18

We are pleased to announce the release of AIVC Contributed Report 18: Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality in New California Homes with Gas Appliances and Mechanical Ventilation!

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CR18: Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality in New California Homes with Gas Appliances and Mechanical Ventilation

Substantial energy is used to condition the air that enters California homes through leaks in the building envelope and ductwork - typically about a third of all heating and cooling. Reducing this through air sealing is essential to California achieving zero energy homes. However, this outdoor air also dilutes pollutants emitted inside homes and contributes to a healthy indoor environment and acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). To address this IAQ issue, California’s Title 24 Building Standards have required mechanical ventilation in new homes since 2008.

Efficiency of recirculation hoods

Recirculation hoods equipped with carbon and plasma filters are becoming more and more popular. The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of recirculation hoods with regard to PM2.5 and NOx removal in a 26 m3 lab kitchen with a gas furnace. With the carbon filter PM2.5 is reduced for about 30%. A fresh carbon filter removed about 60% of the NO2, dropping within a few weeks of cooking to 20%. With the plasma hood NO2 concentrations were above the WHO 1-hour limit and the Dutch health council 15 minutes limit.

Indoor and outdoor distribution of airborne pollutants in naturally ventilated classrooms

The present study aims at investigating concentration levels of particulate matter PM10, PM2.5, PM1 and UFP as well as of total airborne fungi and their vertical distribution in the indoor and outdoor environment of school classrooms. Measurements were performed in two naturally ventilated high schools in Athens, from January until May 2011. Indoor concentrations of the pollutants will be presented per floor level and indoor to outdoor (I/O) concentration ratios will be estimated as a function of the floor height.

Correlation of Particulate Matter with Airborne Fungi in Schools in Greece

The concentration levels of particulate matter (PM), airborne fungi, carbon dioxide as well as temperature and relative humidity were investigated in the indoor and outdoor environment of two schools in Athens, Greece during the period January to May 2011. The overall concentration ranges of the indoor measured pollutants were: PM10: 14.92-166.18 μg/m3, PM2.5: 3.16-31.27 μg/m3, PM1: 0.72-9.01 μg/m3, UFP: 4188-63093 pt/cm3, total airborne fungi: 28-2098 CFU/m3 and CO2: 389-1717 ppm.

Ventilation Strategies in School Buildings for Optimization of Air Quality, Energy Consumption and Environmental Comfort in Mediterranean Climates

This study copes with the problem of ventilation in existing educational environments in terms of indoor air quality (AIQ), comfort and energy consumption. In accordance with international regulations, densely occupied environments such as school classrooms need high air change rates in order to provide sufficient fresh air. Nevertheless, in Italian schools, it is rare to see mechanical ventilation systems or natural systems that are mechanically controlled. This means that it is necessary for the users to control air changes by opening or closing the windows.

Particulate Matter Mass Concentration (PM10) under Different Ventilation Methods in Classrooms

Recently, studies have shown that the classroom environment is very important for students' health and performance. Thus, the evaluation of indoor air quality (IAQ) in a classroom is necessary to ensure students' well-being. In this paper the emphasis is on airborne concentration of particulate matter (PM) in adult education rooms. The mass concentration of PM10 particulates was measured in two classrooms under different ventilation methods in the University of Reading, UK, during the winter period of 2008.

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