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Ranking of Dwelling Types in Terms of Overheating Risk And Sensitivity to Climate Change

Overheating in buildings is expected to increase as global warming continues. This could lead to heatrelated problems ranging from thermal-discomfort and productivity-reduction to illness as well as death. From the indoor-overheating point of view, the sensitivity of 9,216 Dutch dwelling-case to the climate change is quantified and ranked using detailed simulation and post-processing calculations. The results show that the sensitivity depends significantly on the dwelling’s design/operation characteristics. Minimally-ventilated dwellings are the most sensitive ones.

The impact of increased airflow rates on indoor temperatures of passive house in The Netherlands

The increasing number of highly insulated and air tight buildings leads to the concern of indoor environment overheating and related comfort and health issues. This can already happen in a temperate climate as found in the Netherlands. This work studies the ventilative cooling process as a possibility to avoid overheated dwellings. A monitored dutch passive house was modelled in Trnsys and the impact of increasing air flow rates on indoor temperatures was simulated. The most overheated zone was chosen to be analysed.

Facing the global overheating through mitigation and adaptation technologies - the role of ventilation

Regional climate change in cities is the most documented phenomenon of climate change . Higher urban temperatures are  documented experimentally for more than 450 major cities in the world. Numerous investigations demonstrate that the mean magnitude of the temperature increase may exceed 4-6 C, while at the peak it may exceed  10 C. The serious increase of the frequency and the strength of heat waves creates strong synergies between the global and regional climate change and intensify the magnitude of the overheating 

Potential of mechanical ventilation for reducing overheating risks in retrofitted Danish apartment buildings from the period 1850-1890 – A simulation-based study

Advancing energy efficient renovation solutions in buildings necessitate adopting high-insulation and airtightness to avoid heat loss through transmission and infiltration, which can result in overheating. Elevated indoor temperatures have a highly negative effect on building occupants’ health, wellbeing and productivity. With the possibility of remote working, people spend more time at home, and therefore addressing the elevated indoor temperatures and the overheating risks in residential buildings proves to be essential.

Automated window opening control system to address thermal discomfort risk in energy renovated dwellings. Summertime assessment

Major and deep energy renovations of single-family houses (more than 60% of the building stock) are expected in Europe over the next several years (Psomas et al., 2016a). A number of research projects have documented and verified overheating risk during the design and operation phase in nearly zero energy or existing renovated single-family houses without mechanical cooling systems in temperate climates. Post occupancy surveys and comfort studies have also monitored high indoor temperatures over 27oC and 28oC even in Northern countries (Psomas et al., 2016a).

A Case Study assessing the impact of Shading Systems combined with Night-Time Ventilation strategies on Overheating within a Residential Property

Overheating in domestic homes, specifically in built up urban areas, has become a pressing problem throughout the UK. It is likely to become a costly energy problem in years to come if passive design strategies are not fully understood and integrated. This research looks to investigate how internal and external solar shading systems impact on operative temperatures when differing blinds together with a night time natural ventilation strategy are adopted within a renovated block of flats in North London.

Inter-model comparison of indoor overheating risk prediction for English dwellings

According to the 2016 Household Projections report, England’s housing stock could reach 28 million households by 2039 with approximately one fifth being new constructions. A significant proportion of these newly built dwellings may face a high risk of overheating as a result of the combined effects of climate change and more stringent building thermal efficiency standards, if not appropriately designed.

Challenges of using passive ventilation to control the overheating of dwellings in noisy environments

Where residential developments rely on opening windows to control overheating, there can be a compromise between allowing excessive noise ingress with windows open, or excessive temperatures with windows closed. This problem is exacerbated by the move towards better insulated, more airtight buildings and the need, particularly in urban areas, to consider development on noisier sites. A working group has been formed by the Association of Noise Consultants to provide guidance on acoustic conditions and design when considering both the provision of ventilation and prevention of overheating.

Ventilative cooling seminar on April 20, 2016, Cork

A half day seminar, organised by the Cork Institute of Technology in collaboration with IEA EBC Annex 62 – Ventilative Cooling, will be held on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 from 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM in Cork, Ireland.The event will present state of the art in utilising ventilation for reducing cooling energy demand and addressing the risk of overheating in low energy buildings.

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