Measuring the ventilation rate in occupied buildings and adapting the CO2 tracer gas technique

Measuring ventilation rates in occupied dwellings is challenging but represents the conditions that occupants experience. This paper explores the constraints of existing methods when measuring the ventilation rate of occupied buildings and proposes a new method addressing some of them.  

Rethinking Occupancy-Based Ventilation Controls

Traditionally, occupancy-based ventilation controls have only ventilated when occupants are present – usually based on measurements of CO2 and/or humidity.  These indictors may be fine for pollutants released directly by occupants, such as bioeffluents, or by their activities, such as cooking and cleaning. However, they do not account for pollutants not associated with occupancy, such as formaldehyde from building materials and furnishings.

Robustness and True Performance of Demand Controlled Ventilation in Educational Buildings – Review and Needs for Future Development

Although theoretical studies show that energy use for ventilation purposes can be reduced by more than 50% with DCV compared to CAV, evaluation of real energy use demonstrates that this potential is seldom met. DCV-based ventilation systems must become more reliable to close the gap between theoretical and real energy-performance.