Validation of EnergyPlus thermal simulation of a double skin naturally and mechanically ventilated test cell

This paper presents a thermal simulation validation study of the typical precision that a trained thermal simulation engineer can expect to obtain for the simulation of a room connected to a naturally ventilated double skin facade. The open source building thermal simulation tool EnergyPlus is used to predict air and surface temperatures in a free running weather exposed test cell.

Comparison of measured and simulated performance of natural displacement ventilation systems for classrooms

Children spend the majority of their weekdays in classrooms that often have low indoor air quality and limited financial resources for the initial and running costs of mechanical ventilation systems. Designing effective natural ventilation (NV) systems in schools is difficult due to the intense use of the classroom spaces and the dependence of NV on building geometry and outdoor conditions. Building thermal and airflow simulation tools are fundamental to predict NV system performance in the design phase.

Modelling thermal comfort and energy consumption of a typical mixed-cooling apartment in Guilin, China

Many studies have shown that the use of mixed-mode cooling can bring down the cooling load significantly while maintaining satisfactory in door air quality and thermal comfort. But there is little information available concerning mixed-mode cooling in China. Thus, basing on design parameters of design standard, A series of computer simulation of a typical mixed-cooling apartment in Guilin, lies south-west of China, was conducted by Eneryplus and Climate Consultant software.

Using co-simulation between EnergyPlus and CONTAM to develop IAQ and energy-centric demand-controlled ventilation systems

Buildings account for approximately 40 % of energy use in the European Union, as well as in the United States. In light of the European Energy performance of buildings directive, efforts are underway to reduce this energy use by targeting zero or nearly zero energy buildings. In such low energy buildings in cold climates, ventilation to ensure suitable indoor air quality is responsible for half or more of their energy use. The use of heat recovery and demand-controlled ventilation are potential solutions to reduce ventilation-related energy consumption.

Coupling night ventilative and active cooling to reduce energy use in supermarkets with high refrigeration loads

Night ventilation is used extensively as a low energy strategy to cool buildings in climates where night temperatures are suitable. It can be used for spaces utilising natural or mechanical ventilation systems as well as active refrigerant cooling. Most published work focuses on domestic and relatively simple in operation commercial buildings such as offices. This paper presents a study of the cooling benefits of night ventilation for frozen food supermarkets with high cooling demand.

Ventilative cooling and energy use in supermarkets

Supermarkets are a category of non-domestic buildings with high energy use because of their operation. Recent work indicates that by improvements to the energy delivery systems through which internal environmental conditions are maintained such as thermal properties of external envelope including airtightness, HVAC systems and lighting, substantial energy savings can be achieved. Work to date has focused on typical supermarkets while the present paper examines frozen food supermarkets which include more refrigeration cabinets and therefore result in higher energy use per sales floor area.

Stack driven ventilative cooling for schools in mild climates: analysis of two case studies

This paper presents two case studies of stack driven ventilative cooling systems implemented in kindergarten schools located in the mild Subtropical-Mediterranean climate of Lisbon, Portugal. Both systems rely on stack driven natural ventilation supplemented by a larger, single-sided ventilation opening to be used in the warmer months. In both systems air enters the rooms at a low level, directly in front of the heating passive convector systems, and is exhausted in the back of the room, through a chimney.

Building energy and CFD simulation to verify thermal comfort in under floor air distribution (UFAD) design

Corporate tenants require ever-greater design certainty with respect to all aspects of proposed developments. Because of this, its relative novelty and a design methodology that differs from ceiling-based Variable Air Volume (VAV) air conditioning, Under Floor Air Distribution (UFAD) has faced significant scrutiny. Building simulation offers methods to understand the implications of design decisions.

Solving the Black Box: Inverse Approach for Ideal Building Dynamic Behaviour Using Multi-Objective Optimization with Energyplus

The need for zero carbon buildings is changing the trial-and-error process that Architectural design has traditionally employed towards a system that allows wider analysis capacity at the conceptual stage. By visualizing design as a “Black Box” where the composition variable B can be cleared from knowing the stimuli S and the desired response R; optimal solutions arise to the surface.

Modelling and simulation of building energy consumption: a case study on an institutional building in central Queensland, Australia

Modelling and simulation of energy consumption in Information Technology (IT) building on the Rockhampton campus of Central Queensland University, Australia is presented. Design Builder, commercially available software, was used for the prediction of energy consumption. All the possible sources and uses of energy in building were accounted in the modelling and simulation. The operation of the Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system and the lighting energy consumption of the whole building has been studied in detailed.

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