Energy aspects and ventilation of food retail buildings

Worldwide the food system is responsible for 33% of greenhouse gas emissions. It is estimated that by 2050, the total food production should be 70% more than current food production levels. In the UK, food chain is responsible for around 18% of final energy use and 20% of GHG emissions. Estimates indicate that energy savings of the order of 50% are achievable in food chains by appropriate technology changes in food production, processing, packaging, transportation, and consumption.

Using co-simulation between EnergyPlus and CONTAM to develop IAQ and energy-centric demand-controlled ventilation systems

Buildings account for approximately 40 % of energy use in the European Union, as well as in the United States. In light of the European Energy performance of buildings directive, efforts are underway to reduce this energy use by targeting zero or nearly zero energy buildings. In such low energy buildings in cold climates, ventilation to ensure suitable indoor air quality is responsible for half or more of their energy use. The use of heat recovery and demand-controlled ventilation are potential solutions to reduce ventilation-related energy consumption.

Background and Objective of IEA-EBC Annex 78. Supplementing Ventilation with Gas-phase Air Cleaning, Implementation and Energy Implications

The proposed Annex should bring researchers and industry together to investigate the possible energy benefits by using gas phase air cleaners (partial substitute for ventilation) and establish procedures for improving indoor air quality or reduced amount of ventilation by gas phase air cleaning. The project shall also establish a test method for air cleaners that considers the influence on the perceived air quality and substances in the indoor air.

Assessing the energy use and IAQ of various HVAC systems during the early design stage

The early design stage of a building is decisive for describing the concept of the HVAC system. Designers and practitioners can adjust and optimize the design during this stage as it provides them with enough resilience to adapt new changes. In practice, a well-defined optimization process is essentially required in order to achieve the project’s goals within a reasonable time span. These goals vary from one project to another, and sometimes they require a comprehensive study to identify the factual and stochastic parameters and their impact on the design.

Coupling night ventilative and active cooling to reduce energy use in supermarkets with high refrigeration loads

Night ventilation is used extensively as a low energy strategy to cool buildings in climates where night temperatures are suitable. It can be used for spaces utilising natural or mechanical ventilation systems as well as active refrigerant cooling. Most published work focuses on domestic and relatively simple in operation commercial buildings such as offices. This paper presents a study of the cooling benefits of night ventilation for frozen food supermarkets with high cooling demand.

Ventilative cooling and energy use in supermarkets

Supermarkets are a category of non-domestic buildings with high energy use because of their operation. Recent work indicates that by improvements to the energy delivery systems through which internal environmental conditions are maintained such as thermal properties of external envelope including airtightness, HVAC systems and lighting, substantial energy savings can be achieved. Work to date has focused on typical supermarkets while the present paper examines frozen food supermarkets which include more refrigeration cabinets and therefore result in higher energy use per sales floor area.

Requirements and hand-over documentation for energy-optimal demand-controlled ventilation

Demand controlled ventilation (DCV) considerably reduce the ventilation airflow rates and energy use compared to Constant Air Volume (CAV) systems. DCV in commercial buildings is probably a prerequisite to achieve ambitious energy-goal. However, evaluation of real energy use demonstrates that the energy saving potential is seldom met. DCV-based ventilation systems must become more reliable to close the gap between theoretical and real energy-performance.

Simulating life cycle cost for indoor climate systems

The indoor climate system, which serves a building with a proper indoor air quality and thermal comfort, has been predominantly designed based on the initial cost. A life cycle approach could improve both the economic and environmental performance. For example, the energy use could decrease. There has been a lack of knowledge, models and simulation tools for determining the life cycle cost (LCC) for an indoor climate system. The objective of this paper is to present a model for calculating the LCC for indoor climate systems. Focus is on indoor climate systems for premises and dwellings.

Ventilation and energy aspects of food retail buildings

Worldwide the food system is responsible for 33% of GHG emissions. It is estimated that by 2050, total food production should be 70% more than current food production levels.   In the UK, food chain is responsible for around 18% of final energy use and 20% of GHG emissions. Estimates indicate that energy savings of the order of 50% are achievable in food chains by appropriate technology changes in food production, processing, packaging, transportation, and consumption.  

The quality framework for Air-tightness measurers in France: assessment after 3 years of operation

The 2012 French thermal regulation will include a minimum requirement for residential buildings envelope airtightness, with two options to justify its treatment: a) measurement at commissioning or b) adoption of an approved quality management approach. This paper describes the qualification process for air-tightness measurement authorized technicians when their results are to be used in the EP-calculation method. Our analyses underline the importance of the qualification process to ensure homogeneous measurement practice among technicians.

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