Potential of mechanical ventilation for reducing overheating risks in retrofitted Danish apartment buildings from the period 1850-1890 – A simulation-based study

Advancing energy efficient renovation solutions in buildings necessitate adopting high-insulation and airtightness to avoid heat loss through transmission and infiltration, which can result in overheating. Elevated indoor temperatures have a highly negative effect on building occupants’ health, wellbeing and productivity. With the possibility of remote working, people spend more time at home, and therefore addressing the elevated indoor temperatures and the overheating risks in residential buildings proves to be essential.

A novel algorithm for demand-control of a single-room ventilation unit with a rotary heat exchanger

Energy renovations seek to improve the airtightness of dwellings and thus require ventilation and heat recovery to maintain or improve energy-efficiency, indoor climate, and durability. These ventilation systems often control the indoor air of an apartment as a single climate zone, which neglects the different demands of individual rooms. Renovations result in greater retention of heat and air inside the building envelope, so rooms become especially sensitive to gains from solar radiation, occupancy, moisture loads and pollutants.

Performance of low pressure mechanical ventilation concept with diffuse ceiling inlet for renovation of school classrooms

In a great portion of Danish primary schools the mechanical ventilation systems is outdated or simply rely on opening of windows to ventilate the classrooms. This leads to high energy consumption for fans and/or ventilation heat losses and poor indoor environment, as the ventilation systems cannot provide a sufficient ventilation rate. A recent study with 750 Danish classrooms show that 56 % had CO2-concentrations over a 1000 ppm, which is the recommended limit by the Danish working environment authority and this adversely affects the performance and well being of the pupils.