Numerical and experimental identification of factors influencing the pressure homogeneity during an airtightness test in a large building

Airtightness is the most important property of building envelopes to understand the ventilation. Airtightness refers to the flow measurement through the building envelope as a function of pressure across the building envelope. This relationship often fits to a power law, which is the most common way of expressing data. However, pressure homogeneity during airtightness tests can crop up, especially in large buildings.

Experimental study of enclosure airtightness of an outdoor chamber using the pulse technique and blower door method under various leakage and wind conditions

This paper introduces an experimental study of enclosure airtightness testing of an outdoor chamber using both the pulse technique and the blower door method.  This investigation is a 2nd stage comparison study following the previous testing of a house-sized chamber in a sheltered environment.  The outdoor chamber in this study has dimensions, approximately half that of a standard 20ft long shipping container.  Multiple openings were installed into the chamber’s envelope to provide a leakage level and characteristics similar to an average UK house.

Preliminary analysis results of Spanish residential air leakage database

The air leakage impact on energy performance in buildings has already been broadly studied in USA, Canada and most European countries. However, there is a lack of knowledge in Mediterranean countries regarding airtightness. An extensive study has been carried out in order to characterize the envelope of the existing housing stock in Spain. Preliminary results of more than 401 dwellings tested are shown. The sample includes different typologies, year of construction and climate zones. Blower door tests were performed and thermal imaging was used to locate leakage paths.   

A comparison study of the blower door and novel pulse technique on measuring enclosure airtightness in a controlled environment

This paper introduces a comparison study of measuring the airtightness of a house sized test chamber using the novel pulse technique and the standard blower door method in a controlled environment. Eight different testing plates have been applied to the improvised envelope of the chamber to establish different leakage characteristics. Each testing plate has a unique opening in the centre of the plate, achieved by obtaining a different combination of shape and thickness of the opening.

Methodology for the characterization of the envelope airtightness of the existing housing stock in Spain

It has already been proved that air leakage causes a great impact in the energy performance of buildings in cold climates. In recent years, many studies have been carried out in northern Europe, US and Canada. Regulations in these countries establish maximum air leakage rates for the construction of new dwellings and the refurbishment of the existing ones. However, there is a lack of knowledge relating to the housing stock in Spain.

Airtightness and indoor air quality in subsidised housing in Spain

Over three million subsidised dwellings were built in Spain between 1940 and 1980. Most of these buildings are now obsolete and fail to comply with thermal comfort and ventilation standards. A building's existing energy performance, including its airtightness, should be determined prior to conducting low-energy refurbishment, for those factors, particularly the latter, impact thermal comfort, energy demand and indoor air quality (IAQ) fairly heavily.

Field trialling of a new airtightness tester in a range of UK homes

A new low pressure ‘quasi-steady’ pulse technique for determining the airtightness of buildings has been developed further and compared with the standard blower-door technique for field-testing a range of typical UK homes. The reported low pressure air pulse unit (APU) has gone through several development stages related to optimizing the algorithm, pressure reference and system construction. The technique, which is compact, portable and easy to use, has been tested alongside the standard blower-door technique to measure the airtightness of a range of typical UK home types.

Durable Airtightness in Single-Family Dwellings - Field Measurements and Analysis

Durability of the building envelope is important to new homes that are increasingly built with improved levels of airtightness. It is also important to weatherized homes such that energy savings from retrofit measures, such as air sealing, are persistent. This paper presents a comparison of air leakage measurements collected in November 2013 through March 2014, with two sets of prior data collected between 2001-2003 from 17 new homes located near Atlanta, GA, and 17 homes near Boise, ID that were weatherized in 2007-2008.

ACH and airtightness test results in the Croatian and Hungarian border region

The article presents the results of our research, which was realized under a cooperation project between the University of Pécs, Hungary and the University of Osijek, Croatia. The aim was to gather 50 Pa ACH, air tightness and spontaneous ACH information of residential houses by the Croatian and Hungarian border. The budget of the project allowed approximately 50 tests for each university; these summarized results are presented together with correlations found between the results.  

Large buildings airtightness measurements using ventilation systems

The airtightness test of the building is one of a few building envelope measurements used in practice, which is quantitative, not just qualitative as e.g. infrared thermography. The so-called blower-door test result may be a measure of the building design and construction quality and could also be used for the energy demand for heating and cooling analyses.

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